ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Wednesday, 22 May 2013

LATHA MATH GLEANN COMHAN. (22/05/13)

It’s a much cooler day with isolated showers. Tomorrow we move the six miles or so to Loch Leven. The one that runs into and out of Loch Linnhe. It’s a sea loch so does flow both ways, not the one near Kinross.

This morning we walked the logging track for about two and a half hours. A couple of hours up hill and half an hour back down. I didn’t take a tripod so no HDR. I don’t know what these pictures will look like as I’m still not confident looking at the new screen. It was almost dark in the trees but sunbeams were lighting the hills and mountains around._V0G6504 copy  The less romantic side of Scotland. Timber is a thriving industry and apart from tourism there is precious little else.

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_V0G6525 copy     The little dimple to the left of the dead tree breaking the horizon is, as far as I can tell, Ben Nevis. These roads aren’t marked on the map so it’s difficult to be sure exactly where I am. I must get my GPS sorted out…..It is somewhere safe.

_V0G6528 copy     This what the road is really for. I bet his brakes are a bit warm when he gets to the main road.

If I’ve written something rude as the title to this post I apologise. It’s supposed to say Goodbye Glencoe in Gaelic.

glencoepan220513

That’s all for today.

24 comments:

  1. I love the light on the second shot.
    I'm guessing it's pretty quiet there.

    Those roads remind me of the route to Lake Vyrnwy, from Bala, in north Wales. Timber lorries too.

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    1. Keith, the lorry was the only sign of humans that I saw. Most mornings I don't see that.

      Unfortunately the walking is limited by having to use the main road to access more interesting places. It's bloody dangerous with two dogs and no footpath.

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  2. Love the light in the 2nd photo. A bit disconcerting isn't it when one puts a lot of effort into editing and then looks at the result on another screen than one that one is used to... Made a big difference for me when I got an extra screen for my laptop, now the original laptop screen seems to give a blueish tint to everything. Made me realize that I have no control over what fellow bloggers see...

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    1. Monica, it is a nightmare. I'm wondering how or where I can fit a proper monitor.
      I usually send stuff away to print and the girl knows not to drop the colour temperature under 6500K or even 7000k. I let her know. I'll have to run a print here and have a look.

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  3. Beauty. Loch Leven is a special place.

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    1. Thanks Bob...It's all pretty good round here.

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  4. I agree about the second shot. The light lends a mystical quality.

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    1. Pauline, I'm amazed that the Photoshop RAW converter could handle the range on these. The trees and foreground were almost black. I can selectively use different exposures for different parts of the image.

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  5. I'm surprised to see some major logging in Scotland. The logging roads are great for walking if the trucks are not hauling wood.

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    1. Red, logging is a popular job here. I'll try and find the new machines. They grab a tree. cut it off at the bottom twist it sideways trim the branches and cut it into 9' lengths.

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    2. Same thing here. It's all by machine.

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  6. Personally I like my images a little on the warm side. That's why I edit my photos, Have a great rest of the week.

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  7. I had a good look at your photos and feel the they color is spot on, at least your screen and my screen are similar.

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    1. Horst, I prefer a warm look. I have calibrated this screen. I used to have the camera set to cloudy but have popped it back to daylight now.

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  8. those log cutter are a fantastic bit of kit,and a joy to see working . we see a lot of felling here in the forest with this spruce fungus . great views you have where you are.

    peter

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    1. They are Peter. I'll have to find one and get a snap or two.

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  9. I must admit that when I saw the title of this post, I thought you were having a stroke. Amanda would kill me for saying that, as she has scottish blood in her and fiercely proud of it. Alexander Naismith was her ggg grandfather or something. Your images capture the atmosphere really well. Logging is an unfortunate necessity nowadays.

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    1. Gary, I could do with a stroke. I hope I've got it right. Does Amanda speak Gaelic?
      I don't really mind logging better than windmills anyway. They replant with a greater species diversity than they used to.

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  10. I love the second one with that beam of light and the fifth pano. Your landscapes are awesome.

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    1. Maria, thanks. They are easy, they don't fly or run off or blow about.

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  11. Firstly I was struck by the similarity to certain parts of New Zealand by the forestry pictures.

    Secondly Gaelic in not that straightforward (Latha Math = day good = good day) in that there is no single equivalent of good bye. I think the phrase would probably be 'beannachd leibh' or possibly 'beannachd leat'.

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    1. Graham, forestry looks pretty much the same the world over. In temperate regions anyway.
      I hope you aren't teaching me bad words. I asked the girl in the cafe. She did Gaelic at evening classes. Dumb Cluck she is.
      No languages are that simple....Russian is not too bad from what I recall of a crash course I took. I'll go to a charity shop and get some books on the matter.

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