ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Wednesday, 17 July 2013

NO NAY NAVER—DAY TWO. (16/07/13)

I was awakened this morning to a whistling wind and the patter of gentle rain. Things are looking better; it seems to have been howling wind and lashing rain that has aroused me from my slumbers for days. Today I’ll tell you all I know about Brochs. I can assure you it won’t take long._V0G7200_1_2_fused     This pile of stones with a couple of trees on was once a round tower some fifty feet in diameter with walls ten feet thick. Within the walls were chambers. What the chambers were for, the plaque doesn’t say. I can say that I can see the next lot of rain blowing down Loch Naver.

Brochpan1    This is the same thing but shot as a big panorama. Like all todays images it is HDR and the haloing is an unfortunate side effect of my attempt at de-ghosting the tree branches.

_V0G7194_5_6_fused   This is a closer view which almost shows the dry stone construction.

_V0G7176_7_8_fused  This bit shows mans influence much better.

I am very impressed with this. It was built between 100BC and 100AD. Apparently they were not built as fortifications. I think the plaque is tugging my string. I bet they herded their livestock and other precious things inside whenever they were threatened by avaricious neighbours.

This is another good place. It is right next to the road but with half a dozen cars a day traffic noise is not intrusive.

It’s also been a productive day, I stripped the Gen Set carburettor, cleaned out the sludge and washed everything in meths. I popped a new sparking plug in and changed the oil. It’s now running as sweetly as Uma Thurman. That’s more than good enough. It refused to start on Lewis over a month ago so it’s been a while getting round to being sorted. It’s a big load off my mind…I’ll sleep tonight.

That’s all for day two.

11 comments:

  1. I can't imagine why any group would need walls ten feet thick 2000 years ago. What possible weapon could they have that would penetrate a wall even 4 feet thick?

    The stones there look a lot different from stones here.

    In your first picture, the shadow in water looks painted. But then the whole picture kinda looks painted. It is great.

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    1. David, I try to make my images reflect the positive side of life.
      The stones are gneiss a form of granite.
      Have you ever met an angry Scot...No; walls don't stop them. Little violent tinkers with soul they are.

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  2. Did you visit the Broch at Carloway when you were on Lewis? I don't recall you mentioning it. Worth a visit when you return if you did not.

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    1. Graham, I visited, I saw the standing stones and the beach at Uig. We are back this winter. It takes me a while to appreciate a place and airports and ferry terminals put me off my stride. I can see possibilities through the lens. I'll do my bestest with it.

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  3. Over and over again you have commented on rain pattering on the roof. I suddenly remembered my RV and how you could hear the rain on the roof. So after a long time you brought back memories. These ancient sites are very interesting.

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    1. Red, you can hear the near world in a camper and it's as well one remembers the near world can hear you.

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  4. Aren't those round buildings called a Cairn. I believe they lived in them as the weather in Scotland was always so harsh. They also used them for protection again intruders. I'll investigate a little further.

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  5. I was wrong, A Cairn was for the dead. A Broch is the right word for the stone round building. No one is sure what the Broch was used for, possibly for the chief of the village.

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    1. Cairns are generally just a pile of stones left as way markers in hilly country. I presume the Broch was used for hiding things against attack.

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  6. The first close view looks like a natural feature after so many years of nature reclaiming it.

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    1. John, it does and not surprisingly after a couple of thousand years. I don't look that good after half a century.

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