ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Tuesday, 17 March 2015

SPINYWORT. (17/03/15)

This morning I went out with the macro lens. The mosses and lichens  have all suffered during the floods and the very cold nights. The lack of rain for the past week hasn’t helped either.

_MG_2920      Lungwort. Lobaria pulmonaria. I found another large colony of this.

_MG_2919    This is the same lichen but the underside of it.

There are lots of mosses and lichens about but non are fruiting. It’s a good job I found this but I haven’t a clue what it is.

_MG_2911

_MG_2912

_MG_2913

_MG_2914     Whatever it is I am happy with it and would be happier if I could find out what it is. The spines aren’t prickly, they are soft.

33 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Carol, I thought I was the one asking the questions.

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  2. Looks like the lichen Peltigera canina (dog lichen - maybe because those spines [rhizines] look like fangs), or similar species, Adrian. Very variable, depending on habitat and how wet it is.

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    1. Phil, thanks. I must have walked past it half a dozen times and only noticed it this morning. It's growing on a bit of waste ground at the side off a derelict fish farm.

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  3. Is it dog tooth lichen? ...Oh, I now see that Phil has already suggested this. Also sometimes known as felt lichen according to my brief research on your behalf.

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    1. YP, thanks. It is and it's unusual looking stuff. I scanned through fifty images but few if any show the rhizines.

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  4. Cracking set of images Adrian, I'm getting more and more fascinated with the world of Lichens and Mosses at the moment..it's a big subject to get to grips with!!
    Never seen (or not noticed!) any of the Dog Tooth Lichen...think I'll have to pay more attention in future...[;o)

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    1. Trevor, I have never seen this before but maybe I was just lucky to catch it in it's prime. I have looked in other likely places but this is all I've found so far. It's quite large a good inch across.

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  5. I think someone has poached an egg, got frustrated with the results, and flung it away. My
    Poached eggs look a bit like that. Sort of ghosty and traily

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    1. Frances, they do a bit.
      For perfect poached eggs bring a pan of salted water and a dash of vinegar to the boil, turn off the heat swirl the water round and drop the egg inthe middle of the whirlpool. Do them one at a time. If you have dozens to do then as soon as the white has set then remove them from the simmering water and drop them into a bowl of iced water. To serve pop several at a time back into the cooking pan and reheat at a simmer for a couple of minutes. Week old eggs are best. Brand new won't work and neither will old ones.

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    2. Oh. I thought they had to be fresh. Well.....thanks for the cookery lesson. I'll have another go.

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    3. Frances a week old is fresh. A day old and the egg white is like a thick jelly and runny water.

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  6. Magnificas imagenes....me gustan por su color y texturas.
    Un abrazo.

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    Replies
    1. Gracias Jordi. Jo estava molt feliç de trobar-los.

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  7. Never seen anything like the last series of photos. A wonderful find, very unusual growth shape.

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    1. John, neither had I. Brilliant they are.

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  8. Whatever it may essentially Adriaan, beautiful it is.

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    Replies
    1. Bas, I am easily pleased but it made my day.

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  9. What complicates the issue for you is that they go through different stages where their appearance is very different. For example, fall migrating birds can be very different from the breeding plumage.

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    Replies
    1. Red, lichen and fungi are worse than birds but I'm easily confused.

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  10. What a fascinating world is your macro land. I wouldn't even be able to see that detail with my glasses on, so thanks.

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    1. Pauline, the first image of it is about how it looks. This one is about an inch across so much bigger than many flowers.

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  11. Always fascinates me how macro pictures open up a universe by itself. The change of perspective is like a paralell world. If you know what I mean. Fascinating. Beautiful pictures.

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    1. Raffaela, I know exactly what you mean. My favourites are insects. This one was a good find.

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  12. It's fascinating how things are in a closer look. :)
    Great images, Adrian. I'm glad I've found your blog. You've got interesting posts here.

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    1. Lux, thank you very much. As summer approaches there will be many more close up pictures.

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  13. Replies
    1. R.Mac, no hum in fact no discernible smell at all.

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  14. Buenas texturas .El la 3ª imagen se parecen a las setas ;))
    Buen miércoles.
    Un abrazo.

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    Replies
    1. Laura, setas y líquenes parece estar estrechamente relacionados.

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