ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Monday, 13 April 2015

WITHOUT A LEG TO STAND ON. (13/04/15)

It was cool this morning and by lunchtime it had begun to rain. I found a Bumblebee wandering on the path and scooped it up. It seemed very dozy so I decided to make it a drink. I got one picture and it was flying round the van in fine style. I opened the window and away it went. There is gratitude I thought.

_V0G7959      A white-tailed bumblebee queen. Bombus lucorum. She was doing fine and I was hoping to get some head and tail shots but it wasn’t to be. She has two tics by her left wing so perhaps they were annoying her and I was the last straw.

Whilst out on our first walk I stopped to check the tadpoles and lifted a log. This little beauty was hiding underneath.

_V0G7956

_V0G7955      I never noticed when I scooped it into the pot that it was missing lots of legs and antennae. It was lively enough. I can’t find anything like it but the nearest I did find was neither a centipede nor a millipede but something called a symphylid. I’ll keep searching for it as it is very attractive, I’ll also see if I can find a whole one.

I got a very nice e-mail from a lady at the BTO thanking me for the information and the photographs of the leucistic House sparrow. She was impressed with the quality of the images and I thought them a bit soft. I can only assume they get a lot off out of focus pictures.

All images will enlarge with a click.

31 comments:

  1. We had a bug-loving four year old grandson at the weekend, and he and I spent a merry time searching for bugs to put in a jamjar. Including two slugs. I am not fond of slugs...

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    1. Frances, I am struggling to find them up here. There are some attractive slugs but they are difficult to photograph.

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  2. Good for you with the B T O reply. When i was in Falmouth the other week, i saw a bird the size of a Blackbird with a black body and a white head. NO camera and we watched it for 5 min........The only bird that fits it was a South American bird. If only i had that bloody camera.

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    1. Peter, I rarely go out without a camera. It often has the wrong lens on.

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  3. An interesting ????pede. Tried several photo searches but couldn't come near it. Have you tried Phil or maybe the lady who writes BugBlog (link on my site).

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    1. John, it had me baffled as it runs both backwards and forwards. It was far too quick for me to up the magnification so I settled for 1:1 at f16 it's head doesn't look damaged and there were no bits in the pot. I'll check with Phil and the Bug lady.

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    2. John, can't find an e-mail for Africa. I'll wait and see if Phil knows.

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  4. Replies
    1. Tics Carol, bees often have them. Awful things. Keep away from sheep as they are snided with them.

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  5. Oh my dear Lord Adrian, you must have read "The Garden Symphylid: Scutigerella immaculata" by George Albert Filinger. Even more riveting than a night out in Matlock!

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    1. YP, yes I have read everything but the internet is not the best place to read about Scutigeralla, theirs is a clear wee thing half this size. Matlock Pavillion used to be a great night out.

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  6. I'm glad the BTO responded it is always a good way to encourage others to report what they see. From what I understand they're trying to figure out if it's genetic or environmental and are trying to build a better picture of where they all are etc

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    1. Douglas, I will try and get them a sharp shot. I guess it is genetic but I don't know.

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  7. Superb macro work again Adrian.

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    1. Thanks Adam. The problem id they are always on the move. It would be good to get outside for a few shots.

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  8. You could sell these for study books. Amazing macros!

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. Mersad, I have a long way to go but I am getting better at it.

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  9. These images could go in a textbook. Bumble bees were once a common thing for many states until the Africanized Bees entered our worlds. Really scary! They will take down a human in NO time! You have a much nicer bee over there:)

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    1. Chris, female Bumblebees can sting but they rarely do and when they do it is not something to worry about.
      I prefer drawings for text books they always seem much clearer. Stacked images are next best but I suspect the insect is killed for those. I don't agree with that though it would be good to find a dead one.

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  10. you are always interesting and impressive!


    ALOHA from Honolulu,
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^=

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    1. Cloudia, the insects are. I'm boring.

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  11. It blows my mind that you can see ticks on a bee. We only get a fleeting look at a bee. This slows it down so we get a good look at the bee and it's friends.

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    1. Red, tic infestation is common on bees. Some die of it. I'll keep an eye out for a heavily infested one.

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  12. Good to see that you're carrying on with the theme Adrian...last time it was a sozzled beetle(!) now it's a legless specimen!
    Super images once again, it's an amazing 'tiny' world out there
    Just been reading up on Symphylids, it seems that they're not the Scottish spud producers best friend!! ...[;o)

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    1. Trevor, I am addicted to tiny at the moment. I thought when I popped it on the paper that all I seem to be finding are the walking wounded. It was still very fast though.
      I have been looking at insect macros and I am sure that many must be dead. The backgrounds and the focus is just too good for them to be dashing around as mine do. The bee was not fast but was just too large to fit it in at 1:1. The little thing was like lightning, dread to think what it could achieve with a full complement of legs.
      Scottish farmers are a dour lot. I'll have to ask the one next door to save me some creepy crawlies.

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  13. These are amazing macr shots and a world that we would neveer see normally so thanks for photographing these tiny creatures.

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    1. Margaret, it keeps me amused but identifying them is a bit of a problem.

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  14. Lovely creepy things, so tiny. Great macro Adrian.

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