ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Sunday, 4 October 2015

A FEW MORE PHOTOS. (04/10/15)

Before I get to the pictures I would like to comment on a worrying trend.

A few weeks ago I received an email from a well known charity asking for permission to use one of my images. I explained, as I always do, that any images posted are free at the posted resolution but I would appreciate a credit for them. They then asked for a high resolution image. I said it was no problem and they could transfer the money for it into my bank account. I heard nothing more for a couple of days. I then opened my inbox to find a rather snotty email explaining that they were a charity. I replied it makes no difference what you are no money no picture. You may think this a bit mean spirited. I feel it is realistic. If I give stuff away then what is the point of young photographers paying higher education establishments for courses and then being unable to find work because I have given pictures away to massage my ego.

It makes it impossible or very difficult for anyone to earn a living and raise the standard of image production if numpties like me are prepared to give stuff away. Photographic suppliers rarely give me things and the charity concerned certainly believes that charity begins at home; their CEO is earning £180k per annum and they employ twelve people on over £60k per year.

I will bend over backwards to help where I can but it must not be at the expense of someone else's livelihood. This also applies to teaching establishments and any other organisation that charges for their product or services and expects something for nothing.

Here are a few more from the film camera.

Glassarts Glen.

F21

Glassarts Glen.

F22

Fireweed.

F23

Hogweed.

F24

Sow Thistle.

F25

Croquet.

F26

Have a good week.

39 comments:

  1. I'm with you on the charging for quality work Adrian.
    Greyscale film seems to give more subtle shades of grey than digital - well I suppose it should as it is infinitely variable, taking grain into account, unlike digital which has finite levels.

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    1. John, I'm struggling to rationalise it as although these were taken on HP5. A posh low grain film even at ISO400. I am currently shooting a roll at half box speed, 1 stop under to try and lift the sky a bit. The thing I find hard to sort out is that these images were scanned at pretty low resolution and are of course digital. There is still something better about them.
      The scan is 1800x1345px at 300px/in. File size is 1.75MB. A high res. scan would be getting on for 1GB. That would help with Photoshoping but should make little difference when they are compressed for the Web.
      The colour scans are about 2.2MB.

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  2. Really beautiful images, Adrian.
    Kudos for your convictions... I completely agree (not that I've ever sold anything, or given away... but we're young yet!)

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    1. Laura, I am taken with them.
      The problem is that most people think an image they see on a monitor will print. It will but will be appalling. It still costs money in lenses and strobes to produce a half decent image.

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  3. I completely agree with you on the images thing. I have the same policy, and get many requests for my pictures. And it always amazes me how there seems to be no respect for the artist or photographer when they ask such a thing (and I'm not even doing it professionally).

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. Mersad, you spend time and money on getting the images and it is up to the individual to do with them what they please. I would not like to think that it was made more difficult by my giving stuff away.

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  4. There is certainly a subtle and soft quality about the photos yesterday and today. I'm not sure that the first two do anything for me to be honest.The last one certainly does though!

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    1. Graham, I'll keep persevering if only for the fun of using the the camera.

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    2. I also intended to comment on the charity's request and response. I agree with you absolutely. If you had chosen to make a donation then that's up to you. Charities are on my irksome list at the moment and I have already stopped my donations to one because, despite requests, it would not stop calling me on my cellphone (which, unlike my sousaphone, doesn't block calls except from known contacts). I have been quite happy to donate photos to a couple of small charities in NZ which were run by volunteers.

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    3. Graham, it was their attitude that I found offensive. The email was on behalf of the Operations Executive so I decided to investigate and came to the conclusion he was being paid excessively. Far too much as he couldn't even be rude himself but left it to one of his lackeys.
      Run by volunteers is fine but most of these charities are not charities as I understand it. Many private health hospitals, The Royal Opera, National Trust, all commercial operations avoid tax by being registered as charities as do Public Schools. It needs a good looking at.

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    4. Together with churches. I could concede donations being tax free but investment income?

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    5. It's a loophole that needs looking at.

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  5. I think it's the assumption that your work should be free that would annoy me. You take photos of a highly professional standard, and such work should be paid for. Had you offered the photos they wanted, as a gift, you might have felt differently. I certainly would have.

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    1. Frances, I wouldn't want to be a professional photographer. It would take the fun out of it. Neither do I want to be taking work from people that do. When I looked up the institution concerned I was amazed what they spent on themselves before spending anything on the recipients of their cause.

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  6. Again a great set of images mate especially the b/w's.
    As for charities-the rspb pay contributors to their 'image bank' once they've met strict criteria so why shouldn't you. However I do it as case by case scenario. If it's a small, local or very personal to me then I would consider waving charges and have, I got heavily criticised and approached by one professional photographer and criticised by about 10 professionals for giving away images to charities for free but wouldn't back down (perhaps it's the inner Corbyn in me lol). However I would consider a fee for bigger charities if it's a national campaign etc or at least a 'swap' ie one NGO wanted an image for their members magazine so waived the fee for a years membership.

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    1. Douglas, I would hated it if someone had started doing my paid job for nothing. Nobody can stop someone undercutting them but it should not be done as a matter of course.

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  7. I agree with you over your images, that old chest look a treat in the photos.

    peter

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    1. Peter if I could remember where the digital version was I'd compare them. I did put some images for comparison in a folder on my desktop and then deleted them by mistake.

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  8. I'm with you on asking to be paid for your images. We photographers work hard, are up at early or late hours sometimes in inclement weather, and pay big bucks for our equipment. And we've spent many years perfecting our craft. We deserve to be compensated too.

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    1. Linda, i ask what size image they want and then charge what the stock agencies charge. I only get asked a few times a year. They never know how big the image required is so I ask them to put their printer in touch. Printers don't work for nothing, magazine publishers and newspapers don't.

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  9. Replies
    1. I'll do my best, the weather has broken and so it may be a wet week.

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  10. You make a very valid point. Charities that have staff who are that well paid should pay the price.

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    1. Red, the charity has become big business here.

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    2. Exactly the same here.

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  11. The appropriate way for charities to handle this is to pay you and then hope for a donation--That puts the ball in your court.

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    1. Bill, I used to donate to several charities but got sick of being pestered by post, email and phone for further contributions. I now just donate to two.

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  12. Adrian,
    I have been in committee meetings where disputes have arisen over whether to give even an honorarium to an artist / group of musicians - because, as the (arrogant?) argument goes, surely publicity is payment enough. I have (more than once) wanted to ask if other purveyors producing goods and services for charitable events were offered similar terms.
    Love the photos! McGregor

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    1. McGregor, it is annoying. The point I feel strongly about is not that I would be unwilling to give my amateur work away but were I to do so I take the bread from the mouth of a professional.
      I get requests and as I can't stop folk pinching low res internet images don't even try. I do not like them messing with them and I do expect a credit. I use free stuff but always acknowledge it on my videos even though it takes thirty minutes to give them a credit, it's just good manners. I ask other bloggers for use of their images but give them a plug as well.

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  13. HI Adrian I prefer the shot is colour for the views of the countryside. I love the last shot of the the trunk and croquet set.

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    1. Margaret, the B&W shots could do with a bit of dodging and burning but I suspect I'll need better scans for that.
      I like this 75mm Zenzannon II lens. the only thing I find worrying is the inbuilt Sieko shutter. I'll have to get some repair equipment if I decide to carry on using older cameras.

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  14. Buenas imágenes Adrian. Has hecho bien pero si quirene te robaran la imagen con peor calidad.
    En España en un centro comercial, una persona se encontró una foto suya que la vendían en un cuadro por 10 €. , se la habian robado. Habló con ellosy dijo que los denunciaría en compensación le dieron 1.000 €. Pero si no te enteras estan haciendo negocio a cnn de las fotos que roban.
    Un abrazo.

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    1. Laura, es malo robar. Error esperar cosas para ser regalado.
      He tenido imágenes robadas pero nunca poner imágenes en cualquier lugar en alta resolución.

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  15. Nice shots! I fully agree with you.

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  16. A message from a numpty photographer whose ego has been massaged to death - lovely set of pictures Adrian.
    By the way Ordnance Survey have sent me my maps and they have acknowledged me on the covers - Doncaster and Isle of Axholme. They didn't even ask for permission! They just did it - I suppose because geograph is sponsored by OS.

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    1. YP, I have become very wary of posting to sites where after doing so the image belongs to the site. Magazine competitions are one of the worst offenders.

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