ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Wednesday, 30 March 2016

KNOCK, KNOCK. (30/03/16)

It was another cool start to the day but it’s dry and sunny.
I stopped on our walk by the woodpecker’s tree but it has swapped trees. I found it again and got a few more snaps. This tree is slightly less twiiggy than the previous one and it made it easier to get pictures. With the lens opened right up the bits of branch aren’t too noticeable.
_MG_4050 The first sighting or partial appearance.
_MG_4059



_MG_4064
Not birder standard but I’m very pleased with them. I think this is a male Great Spotted Woodpecker.
I am helping sort out a seed drill and then I’m going to get stuck into another ploughing video. I have it rough cut and the title is done so just the sound to synchronise now and a final polish and it will be ready to send to YouTube.

12 comments:

  1. Love the photos. Such a pretty creature!

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    1. Marie, they do hop about a bit too much for my liking.

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  2. Well captured Adrian, you'll soon have it sitting on the end of the lens!...[;o)

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  3. Replies
    1. Cloudia, for a colourful bird they can be hard to spot until they start pecking.

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  4. I can just see a bit of red on the back of its head so that should be a male.

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    1. John, the red cap is quite small bit I guessed a male.

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  5. I missed him in the first--- till I saw the second. I love woodpeckers so long as they're not pecking our house.

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    1. Bill, they are little devils for disappearing round the blind side of the tree.

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  6. Like Bill I could not seee him in the first shots until I saw the second shot. Yes a male Woodpecker

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    Replies
    1. Margaret, they can be hard to spot until they either tap or move.

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