ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Friday, 13 October 2017

SEXTANT.

Not the instrument that used to be an extension of my right arm and told me where I wasn't after twenty minutes spherical trigonometry. This one is much more attractive and is posing on my left hand. The rain has been both continuous and torrential today so as it cleared late afternoon we all went for a wander. Fungi are leaping from the ground and I have a few snaps. Here is the star of the post.


A Sextant Beetle. They wander about sniffing out dead things with the orange bits on the end of their antennae. When they find an ex-mouse, shrew or whatever they crawl underneath and dig until it is buried. Some folk call them Burying Beetles. 
I think this is Nicrophorus vespilloides. Not sure of it's sex so will be a cool, right on left wing Londoner and say it is transgender, Londoners are sexually confused for a reason. It's not a good idea to re-cycle sewage with oestrogen in, then drink it. 
You can often tell male from female insects by looking at their bum, much like humans in fact. I see pincers which in the insect world suggests male but these are small.
 It looks to be under attack from the Mites but these are just hitching a ride to the next corpse. They are phoretic mites and as these are running about on the Beetle I'm going to guess at Poecilochitus carabi. Some types hook on and are stationary like the ones one sees on Harvestmen.
I deleted the last post as having spent a day for no reward being pumped for information by parasitic government employees I had a fall out, cut my losses came back home and cuddled a poorly horse. I couldn't identify the fungi either as my book is still AWOL.
I hope these are Honey Fungus. I have watched them for a couple of days and have never seen so many. They are all over the forest in their thousands. These are shot with the light behind and fill flash from almost head on. 

I'll have another go with an extra strobe and I'll vary the depth of field. Maybe take out all the crap in the foreground. I think a few prints of something on this stamp would be okay for Christmas.

12 comments:

  1. I like insect / beetle / etc. pictures. Am always amazed to see how many different elements go into the creation of one individual. So much more complex than human bodies - and often more beautiful. But this is different. I can't analyse or explain my reaction but I find I'm repelled. There's something unpleasant about the way the colours on its back merge murkily instead of being crisp. And I don't know why I'm bothered by the mites hitching a ride. If it doesn't bother the beetle then it shouldn't bother me. But it does.
    Very impressed by its orange sniffers though.

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    1. Lucy, I find some insects frightening, Great Diving Beetles and cadis fly larva. I wasn't anything but excited to have found this.

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  2. Hi Adrian. Fascinating and splendid images of the beetle. I've only seen one once and it didn't have nearly as many mites on as that one you've got. I can understand Lucy's discomfort, even though those mites aren't doing any harm. These beetles and their mites do a splendid job of keeping the countryside sanitary!

    I think that these are usually called Sexton Beetles, named after the church person charged with looking after the graveyard.

    Best wishes - - - Richard

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    1. Richard, I suspect they are just difficult to find. Thanks for Sexton. I knew something wasn't right but I can be a bit thick.

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  3. geweldig wat is hij mooi van zo dichtbij.

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  4. A nice catch - a right little bobby dazzler.

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    1. John, it made my day. I'll see if I can find another.

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  5. Nice find Adrian, I'm still waiting to find my first one! (if you point it towards the sun will it tell you which way to go to find home?) This one's carrying a lot of passengers, I hope they pay well?
    Time to hunker down Adrian...looks like Ophelia is on her way to pay you a visit!!

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    1. Trevor, I got my navigation instruments and grave diggers confused. I rarely see dead mice and I suspect dead pigeons are too much for them I'd like to find another. I think it time to start lashing stuff down.

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  6. I'm with Lucy. While I admire the detail and should thank you for showing the mites in such detail, they just give me the creeps. Safe safe in the storm!

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    1. Pauline, I never thought to be revolted, I was pleased to have found such a rare beast.
      Suspect the storm will just be an autumn gale.

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