ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Thursday, 5 September 2013

LUXURY. (05/09/13)

We are staying on a campsite adjacent to the Tees Barrage and Portrack Nature Reserve. It must be eighteen months since I was last here. It’s not the most salubrious of areas but I usually enjoy myself. _MG_1436Portrack Nature Reserve. The two big towers are Middlesbrough lifting bridge.

There wasn’t much about this morning but it was still a pleasant walk.

_MG_1432 The Tees Barrage.

_MG_1435 It is a long time since I’ve seen these. Robbins Pincushion Gall or Rose Bedeguar Gall. It is full of wasp larvae.

It is a real luxury editing pictures on the new monitor. It’s something else I should have done years ago.

If the weather brightens up I’ll go out for some more pictures later.

That’s all for today.

34 comments:

  1. In the second one the gradual increase in the haze is very nice. I think I like it best but the third one is really good too. That is some pretty colors in the Gall but those sticker things clearly say, stay away!

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    1. David, apparently if you burn the gall and crush the ashes up then rub them into your scalp they cure baldness.

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    2. Do you need to get the wasp larvae out first or do they assist in hair regrowth? Maybe you can find the guy who made this discovery and take a picture of him?

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    3. David, I suspect that it's a medieval cure. I'm old but not that old.

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  2. Dat speldenkussen heb ik nog nooit gezien maar het staat er wel heel mooi op.

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  3. It looks like I could scrub my pots and pans with that last one.

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    1. Galls are quite interesting things. This is as prickly or sharp as it looks.

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  4. So what's the plan Adrian? Are you heading south for the Winter or just hanging out around civilization for a bit?

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    1. Carol, I'm in Darlington to see friends, Then next week I'll head down to York. After that it's the Lake District. Then down to Derbyshire. I should be back in Scotland about the middle of December.

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  5. You seem to be fighting dull rainy weather most of the time. It must get frustrating sometimes. Interesting that the galls are full of wasp larva. Watch out next year!

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    1. Red, it's been a good summer by UK standards. Very heavy rain is forecast for tomorrow.

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  6. Adrian, thank you for post your photo of a Gall, i have trying to find out what it was as i took a photo of one the other day. Many thanks.


    peter

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    1. You are welcome Peter. If you Google it there is plenty of information.

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  7. The Tyne is a special case, it is wide, has water flowing in it. What else do you want. Great photos Adrian.

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  8. The Tyne is a special case, it is wide, has water flowing in it. What else do you want. Great photos Adrian.

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  9. That "robins" thingy, does it come in green as I saw somthing outside the hide today, exactly the same but green I had never seen it before?

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    1. Douglas, they start out light green and then turn red,

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    2. It was light green, never seen it on the reserve, I shall keep my eyes on it ready for when it goes red, it looked very odd and reminded me of a Long tailed Tit nest.

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    3. Douglas, these are only about an inch and a half across.

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  10. I see you're closer to civilisation now, I don't know if this is good or not for you.

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    1. Maria, it has it's advantages. It is different.

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  11. Hi Adrian I am glad you are enjoying your new monitor. I saw and photographed the Robbins Pincushion Gall on the I.O.W. this year. I didn't know what it was but Eileen my friend from there pointed it out to me. have a great weekend.

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    1. Margaret, it is Robins Pincushion. I was a bit heavy handed on the 'B'. There seem to be a few about this year.

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    2. HI Adrian I thought that but thought you might know better than me!!!

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  12. Nice to see you are back in Yorkshire (Cleveland was a Tory invention).

    The rose bedeguar gall, Robin's pincushion gall, or moss gal develops as a chemically induced distortion of an unopened leaf axillary or terminal buds, mostly on field rose (Rosa arvensis) or dog rose (Rosa canina) shrubs, caused by the parthenogenetic hymenopteran gall wasp (Diplolepis rosae).
    Diplolepis females lay up to sixty eggs within each leaf bud using their ovipositors. The asexual wasp emerges in spring; less than 1% are males.
    A similar gall is caused by Diplolepis mayri, but this is much less common.

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  13. Nice to see you are back in Yorkshire (Cleveland was a Tory invention).

    The rose bedeguar gall, Robin's pincushion gall, or moss gal develops as a chemically induced distortion of an unopened leaf axillary or terminal buds, mostly on field rose (Rosa arvensis) or dog rose (Rosa canina) shrubs, caused by the parthenogenetic hymenopteran gall wasp (Diplolepis rosae).
    Diplolepis females lay up to sixty eggs within each leaf bud using their ovipositors. The asexual wasp emerges in spring; less than 1% are males.
    A similar gall is caused by Diplolepis mayri, but this is much less common.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nice to see you are back in Yorkshire (Cleveland was a Tory invention).

    The rose bedeguar gall, Robin's pincushion gall, or moss gal develops as a chemically induced distortion of an unopened leaf axillary or terminal buds, mostly on field rose (Rosa arvensis) or dog rose (Rosa canina) shrubs, caused by the parthenogenetic hymenopteran gall wasp (Diplolepis rosae).
    Diplolepis females lay up to sixty eggs within each leaf bud using their ovipositors. The asexual wasp emerges in spring; less than 1% are males.
    A similar gall is caused by Diplolepis mayri, but this is much less common.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Nice to see you are back in Yorkshire (Cleveland was a Tory invention).

    The rose bedeguar gall, Robin's pincushion gall, or moss gal develops as a chemically induced distortion of an unopened leaf axillary or terminal buds, mostly on field rose (Rosa arvensis) or dog rose (Rosa canina) shrubs, caused by the parthenogenetic hymenopteran gall wasp (Diplolepis rosae).
    Diplolepis females lay up to sixty eggs within each leaf bud using their ovipositors. The asexual wasp emerges in spring; less than 1% are males.
    A similar gall is caused by Diplolepis mayri, but this is much less common.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks YP. It is a little black wasp with yellow legs.....Brilliant is nature....How the hell did it learn to do all that.

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  16. Much as I like my laptop I have to use the PC and its larger widescreen monitor to see what I am doing.

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    1. John, I can't believe the difference it makes. I still have many of the tool bars and pop up menus appear on the laptop screen. When I find out how to move the ones that won't drag and drop I'll shift more of them.

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  17. ooo, back to reality, must seem a million miles away from Loch Linnhe and Rannoch Moor.

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