ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Saturday, 14 September 2013

THE SPIDER. (14/09/13)

It’s a windy but sunny day. I went out with the macro lens to look for creepy crawlies. there were lots about but they were all moving too fast for me to keep in focus. the only little beast I found to be co-operative was the Garden Spider. It is their time of the year._V0G7594

_V0G7595

_V0G7593

_V0G7592

_V0G7590

_V0G7589  The bigger of them is the female.

I did attempt to focus stack but it is a hopeless task. I also found a tiny Zebra Spider but they jump and every time I pressed the shutter it hopped out of the frame. The garden Spider is about half an inch or twelve millimetres  long.

The weather is not looking good for tomorrow with heavy rain and gales forecast.

 

27 comments:

  1. Interesting patterns and colours in their skin/fur almost tortoiseshell. There is no way the naked eye could pick that up. You are inspiring me to give macro photography a go. A camera would help in the first instance :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Carol, they are fascinating. Bridge cameras have a macro setting and the small sensor in them gives excellent depth of field.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Adriaan wat heb je hier een engerd te pakken,maar wel heel mooi.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  5. What a beautiful, horrible creature. Good pix.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. JoLynne, I just find them beautiful. I can watch insects for ages. Some do have revolting habits though.

      Delete
  6. Hi Adrian Well that certainly is close! It is very intersting to see all the patterns and what looks like textures on such a small spider. Hope you are having a good weekend and you better batten down the hatches when the storm comes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, I really enjoy using this lens. The depth of field is a problem but not much to be done about that with moving creatures.

      Delete
  7. Stunnibg set of images Adrian, the level of detail on all of them is stunning. However I like the first one as it's probably the last thing a fly sees.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Douglas, I could do with finding a dead one. Then I could focus stack a monster image.
      One of these was wrapping a trapped fly about every twenty minutes.

      Delete
  8. Wonderful images Adrian, you have a nack for macro.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Horst, my hit rate is getting better with time. These are all taken with a ring flash. I can get half decent results up to 2x magnification. I may get one printed next Thursday. They will print easily at a foot square.

      Delete
  9. A year ago if someone had told me that a year thence, I would be looking at pictures of spiders, I would have said, "no, I don't think so." That's how good your pictures and what you say about them are. If I get time I'll google and see what these things eat, I'm always curious about that.

    Oh and that comment I deleted was only because I had posted in the wrong place. Whoever programmed Blogger to do the "this comment has been deleted by author" thing should be spider food.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David, welcome to the nut house.
      They eat other insects and sometimes the unfortunate male spider.
      There are many annoying things about Blogger but it's free and it works fine for the most part.

      Delete
  10. I really like how you got the spiders on the webs. There's a lot of difference between the male and female.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Red, I wasn't confinced they were the same species but I looked them up on 'Spiders 'R' Us' and the males is much smaller than the female.

      Delete
  11. Excellent set Adrian, and cracking detail.

    I think I'll put my macro lens back in the cupboard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Keith, I'm slowly getting to grips with the MP-E 65mm. It would be good on your moths.
      It was good fun. I found a tiny Zebra Spider but it jumped every time I tried to capture an image of it. I found it sitting inside the ring flash this morning.....Little tinker.

      Delete
  12. Wow, great shots and amazing detail Adrian. That lens, together with some expert input from the photographer (of course!!), really does the business. Looking forward to the focus stacked images?..[;o)

    btw. If you haven't already seen it, I've left a comment(apology!) on your previous post...[;o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trevor yes I've seen it. No apology necessary.
      Finding a dead insect is never easy. I expect three will come along at once.

      Delete
  13. Great shots and sparkling detail.

    ReplyDelete
  14. The photos are great ... but this I like least: (((
    A hug.

    ReplyDelete
  15. There is something very satisfying about macro photography especially when it takes one into another world: like these do.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Graham, I love this lens. It is a challenge but does it do the business? Not yet it does't in my hands but it will. It will if I have enough will to master it.
    I dislike using the Canon 100mm IS stabilised lens. Do you fancy one at half price....One careful owner. Never taken out on the really wet days, never dropped in the sea or even a pond. Above all.... Guaranteed not to rust, bust, pick up dust or buckle or bend for a day.

    ReplyDelete