ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Friday, 7 February 2014

THE BRIDGE. (07/02/14)

All seems to be going to plan today. The new rear light clusters arrived and what is more they are the right ones. To be a little pedantic they are the left and right ones as they just invert to hand them. They are sparkling bright and guaranteed not to rust, bust, pick up dust, buckle or bend. I’ll fit them this afternoon as it is going to be very windy and wet tomorrow._V0G7993 Very Smart. I’ll try not to reverse into anything for a few weeks.

It’s a beautiful day and feels almost like spring. We walked down the Tees to the lifting bridge. I don’t know why I’ve never done it before.

_V0G7987_8_9_fused  On the way we passed under the A19 road bridge. A rather dismal concrete and steel structure, another half mile or so wandering the banks of the Tees.

_V0G7972_3_4_fusedThe Tees with the Barrage on the horizon. 

_V0G7984_5_6_fused  Middlesbrough New Port Bridge. It was built in 1930 and the last lift was in 1990. It became redundant when they started the construction of the Tees Barrage about a mile upstream. I love structures like this. The Tees has many wonderful bridges and I ought to get my bum in gear and produce a wee book about them.

That’s all for today, have a great weekend.

53 comments:

  1. I love bridges too ~ so I will be reserving my copy of your wee book. What do you mean by a lifting bridge? Did the bridge rise with the flood water? I imagine that is what you mean if they then put in a barrage. Beautiful engineering aren't they. It was a quiz question on last night's quiz ~ Where is the longest bridge in the world (at over 1600 metres)? 1600 metres ~ that is 1.6 kilometres of bridge!!!

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    1. Carol, it lifted on the cables you can see in my snap to allow ships to pass underneath it.
      Denmark to Sweden but that is a concrete and steel job. They also cheated a bit as they island hopped it.
      Who built Sydney Harbour Bridge?

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    2. I must have heard incorrectly last night. The longest bridge in the world is over 160000 mtrs ~ no! surely not. That is what Wikipedia is telling me. And no it is not the Sydney Harbour bridge. The longest bridge is in China. 160000 mtrs ~ that is 160kms !!!

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    3. Carol, even we have briges longer than Sydney. It was built I believe about four miles up the road from here.
      The Chinese have been known to fib.

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    4. PS. By Dorman Long.. It was built at the same time as this bridge. They still have a company called Cleveland Bridge here so if you have problems feel free to call.

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    5. Yes, Adrian. I knew about Dorman Long and Bros & Sons ~ they also built the Tyne Bridge.

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  2. What the...?!?!?! It actually IS a "lifting bridge" as you called it. I was picturing a drawbridge of some sort, lifting from one end or the other, but not both ends. How very clever! But how can it be redundant if the new bridge is upstream? Wouldn't boats still need to get beyond the old bridge before passing under the newer bridge? Perhaps you were referring to land vehicle traffic, not maritime....

    I love the new lights. Well, not love exactly -- my father always said you can't love anything that can't love you back -- but I do like them a lot. Happy installing.

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    1. Bob, you are correct. Draw Bridges on Castles are lifting bridges you can read all about it at 'Tees New Port Bridge.'
      Upstream and downstream are reversed on opposite sides of the Atlantic. We have Red buoys on the left entering a navigation you have them on the right. God knows why you got confused. You managed to get wind arrows pointing north for a southerly wind but just didn't follow the logic through. We are a contrary nation. We drive on the wrong side of the road here. I tried your system and know why we do. Even on a Sunday morning it was bloody terrifying.

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  3. My comment makes sense only if you define "upstream" and "downstream" the way I do. In this country, "upstream" means nearer the source and "downstream" means nearer the mouth. Perhaps it is different over there.

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    1. Bob, that bit is the same here. I was looking upstream when I took the snap. Now You have me confused. Yes I was looking towards the source in the hills.

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  4. That's a splendid looking bridge Adrian, the lifting bridge, not that concrete monstrosity. What a shame it's no longer in use, did you ever see it working?
    I hope you didn't have too much trouble fitting the new lights?
    Enjoy the weekend weather!!...[;o)

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  5. Trevor, it needs to be lit at night. They used to light the Barrage but no longer can afford to. They also have a transporter bridge which is a bit younger and a few miles down stream.
    New lights were plug and fit. I'm an electrocutioner. Between myself and the parts man yesterday we cracked the job first time. Not easy with parts men. Most just guess.

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  6. The perspective you've given to the bridge is fabulous. Nice picture!
    Buen fin de semana ;)
    a hug.

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    1. Laura. It is a beauty of a bridge. A bit far away but worth the walk.

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  7. I like the lifting bridge, is the "shed" like building in the middle the control room? What a shame it's redundant though it reminds me of meccano too I do hope they don't allow it to fall into disrepair.

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    1. Douglas, it took a staff of eight men to work it. They lived there working lives in that shed. If power failed it was possible to hand winch it. Though I doubt they ever did.

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  8. Adrian what are those old steel bridges so beautiful they will not be able to process all the modern traffic but local traffic perhaps. hopefully they keep him still, have a very good weekend.

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    1. Bas, it is still a bridge used by road traffic. I hope they become wealthy enough up here to appreciate it. They have money for new bridges but should look after the older ones.

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  9. What an amazing structure. Some great work constructing that.

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    1. Keith it is a belter of a bridge.

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  10. A wonderful photo of the Middlesbrough New Port Bridge, Adrian ~ I also noticed the way the wisps of clouds bridged the bridge from tower to tower, swooping from one, going up and then swooping to the other.

    It must feel like spring after your wintry experience in Scotland :)

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    1. Glo, them wisps are happen chance and arial pollution by aircraft. None the worse for it and better than the snap on Wiki.

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  11. The colour palette from which your pictures are derived is both interesting and effective.

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    1. YP, I'm colour blind. I have to get a lass in Sheffield to colour correct my pics. I just work on histograms.
      Thanks though it makes me seem a lot posher than I am.

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    2. Anyone called Adrian as as posh as John Selwyn-Gummer in my book.

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  12. Adrian! I'm happy that you receved the right one! ... The bridge in the last photo is fantastic! I love the green and the style!

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    1. Laura, it is hard work being an idiot. It is a wonderful bridge. I don't really know what an impressionist would make of it though it would be good to see it through your eyes.

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  13. I love these old bits of a time long gone, they realy knew how to construct in those days


    peter

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    1. Peter, nothing was too much trouble back then. Problems were thought about and solved by artisans. From the designer to the welder or riveter, to the folk that forged those chains on the counter balances, to the folk that spliced the lift wires. It isn't art but it gets bloody close to art. .

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  14. Those pictures are amazing, and the last of them, it is superb Adrian.

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  15. Glad to hear to rear clusters were the correct ones Adrian.
    A photo book on the bridges sounds like a good idea.... go for it.

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    1. Andrew, miracles do happen.
      I'll seriously think about a book.

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  16. Dismal and redundant; yet there is beauty there, still. A lesson could be learned here. Adrian, I think you would like Sheffield, Alabama, my current stomping grounds. Once, it was a city; now, it is a ghost. But ghosts can possess an ethereal beauty all their own, if you have the right kind of eyes. And your pictures show that you have 'em!

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    1. Nathaniel, I like degenerating industrial sites. They can be fascinating.

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    2. I have never been to England, but I have an inkling that these cities in Alabama that were named for places "over the pond" may have more in common with one another than I realize. Alabama's largest city per capita - Birmingham - was once a thriving manufacturer of iron goods. I'm no economist, but as an amateur student of our history, I can't help but believe that Alabama's slowness to change from agriculture to industry to information is the root cause of so many of our ills.

      You may want to look into Sloss Furnace: it was once an ironworks. Now? Every Halloween, it is transformed into a "haunted house" by various carnival freaks (I have known some of them, and they wear the name "freak" as a badge of pride), who charge admission to tell tales of the ghosts of workers who died during the height of the Industrial Revolution. I don't believe in ghosts, but I do believe in man's inhumanity to man, so I have never felt the need to attend.

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    3. Nathaniel, that does sound weird.
      I spent some time in Idaho. I enjoyed it but the culture gap was too much. Racks of guns in pickup trucks and conversely folk running around praising the lord.

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    4. I can't say I've ever been to Idaho, but if gun racks, pickup trucks, and lord praising aren't your thing... well, maybe you should steer clear of Alabama after all! I'm afraid that's pretty much all they do around here. The food is pretty good though. If you like hardened arteries, that is.

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    5. I can't see me visiting the States again. I have many happy times there though.

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  17. I might have to study a bit to get to a point of love but I do admire the massive look and solidity of the bridge.

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    1. David, I was impressed with it.

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  18. Great that you've finally got some decent weather.The bridge runs through a very dismal area. Winter there has been harsh.

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    1. Red, it isn't too dismal. It could be wonderful if the unemployment wasn't such a problem. It has been a very mild if stormy winter.

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  19. I never cease to wonder at bridges and their construction. My first memories of being in awe were going across the Widnes-Runcorn Transporter Bridge when I was knee high to a grasshopper. It seems almost impossible sometimes to remember what the West Coast of Scotland crossings used to be like (in once case I can recall the car sharing the bridge with the train in the same way that still happens in South Island, NZ). It's good that this bridge is still there in its current form. Even without maintaining the lifting gear it must be expensive to maintain.

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    1. Graham there is a big transporter bridge here. I'll have to work out how to get at it.
      I hope they keep maintaining it. I hope it is listed.

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  20. The last bridge image looks so surreal and vibrant.

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    1. Maria, it would look much better were it lit up at night.

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  21. I am fascinated by lift bridges- never seen one in person. Shame this one has been put to pasture!

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    1. Terri, as far as I know there are only three in the UK. One is definitely working on the Isle of Sheppey. There is another in Newport Wales but I haven't seen it.

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  22. HI Adrian Love the bridge at the end shot and I am sure it looks lovely when lite up at night

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  23. Thanks to my construction engineer for checking out for any structural damage of the routes I use. It's a long one and I often wonder what's underneath. Classic Transporter bridge shot, not see a better daytime shot than that.

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  24. Jay, it is a wonderful bridge. They should light it at night but I'm not sure that I'd want to walk on my own down there.

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