ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Sunday, 5 October 2014

THE CHARMER. (05/10/14)

It’s been a bad few days for photographs. Today there were lots of Buzzards about but all flying too far away for any chance of an image. It’s a beautiful sunny Sunday and could well be the last good day for several months.

A friend called round for lunch and after a roast pork dinner I took her to the patch of ground where I’ve seen the newts. We sat down with the dogs tethered to a tree and waited by the cracks in the earth where they live. After sitting a while a tiny jet black frog appeared but shot into some grass before I could get it’s picture. She said are you sure there are newts here. I said definitely so she crouched down and cupped her hands over the crack; a few minutes later a newt appeared. I was impressed, just imagine what she could do if she had a whistle as well. A superb Newt Charmer.

_V0G7509      I think this is a Palmate Newt. There is a much bigger one with a white flash on it’s tale. I’ll go and have another look for it as I think it is a Great Crested Newt. Her charming skills didn’t charm it today but I will try the trick on Tuesday. I was going to the Lake District but the forecast isn’t good and I have a job to do on Wednesday. Internet here has been a bit iffy. I’ll do my best to catch up early tomorrow.

Have a good week.

32 comments:

  1. Nice little Newt, it is too late down in southern England to see them.

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    1. Bob I never see them in ponds but amphibians seem to gather in this bit of set aside land. There are still worms and insects about so on warm days and if shaded they will come out to have their picture taken. I don't know where they breed as there isn't a pond for miles. There must be but I haven't found it.

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  2. They breed in my garden ponds and each of those is only a couple of feet across so they can obviously manage with pretty small areas of water. And yes, that is a palmate newt.

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    1. Thanks John, they seem to be very variable in colour. I think all amphibians change to match their environment. There were smooth newts using this bit of ground last year but I haven't seen any this year. A pity they are friendlier.

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  3. Scared of any reptile small or big :0)))

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    1. Ruby, these don't bite and if they did I doubt they could do any harm. They are only about 8cm long.

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  4. Newt charming that would make Ken Livingstone jealous:-) our pond on the park has both palmate and crested I managed some video courtesy of my phone. I saw on BBC SCOTLAND they have had some snow already

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    1. It's difficult finding them when they leave the pond.
      Yes Cairngorme has a bit of snow.
      I'd like to see your video.

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  5. You both make a good team with your newt skills.. her for calling them.. you for photographing them. They're cute little things, aren't they?

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    1. Hilary, yes it's a two person job. They are beautiful.

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  6. You know what they say: No newts is good newts.

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    1. Bob they do but it doesn't apply to me.

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  7. Now I've heard of horse whisperers but never newt whisperers

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    1. Red, it was a new one for me. A good trick.

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  8. Thank you! I adore and have kept newts as pets!


    ALOHA from Honolulu
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^= . <3 . >< } } (°>

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    1. They are interesting little creatures.

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  9. Cute little creatures, aren't they?

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    1. They are Pauline, they take some finding though.

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  10. I used to go nesting on Jackson's Pond when I was a kid. They were two a penny. I thought you'd like to know that. Jackson's Pond is now somewhere under a housing estate (of course).

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    1. Graham, yes I used to see dozens when I was a child. It is amazing how much land has been built over in my lifetime. Sad but folk can't all live like gypsies.

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  11. That's amazing Adrian. Well worth the wait.

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    1. Adam, yes it was. I have seen Smooth Newts here before but it seems to be a popular place for them to settle down before winter. I'll try for some better shots.

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  12. Meanwhile, why not get pissed as a newt? I wonder how that saying arose....

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    1. YP, in spring their courtship display involves staggering from side to side. Pity it doesn't work for humans.

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  13. What an intriguing animal.

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    1. Maria, unfortunately they are losing habitat so are not as common as they were.

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