ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Thursday, 16 June 2016

TREASURE. (16/06/16)

Yesterday a wonderful mechanical contrivance arrived in the shed. It was made somewhere around the mid seventies in Cornwall by Holman who were mining equipment engineers. _MG_5634

It’s a rotary screw air compressor driven by a twin cylinder Lister diesel engine.

_MG_5643 It does need a bit of a clean up, an oil and filter change. It works fine or does after the fuel tank was drained of old diesel, water and surprisingly a dead bird. A quick fuel bleed and away it went. It blew all the bits of chaff and stalk out of the combine grain deck and screens. A wonderful find.

_MG_5618 A clean combine with a rebuilt differential brakes and gearbox, it’s all ready to have it’s header fitted. Header fitting is one of those ten minute jobs that takes an hour but since this snap was taken it is on and apart from new mirrors and a couple of ram pins it is ready to go harvesting.

Here are a few more photographs of the compressor. If anyone is interested I can let you know what most of the bits are.

_MG_5626

_MG_5631

_MG_5637

_MG_5640

_MG_5643

It is gorgeous.

35 comments:

  1. Treasure indeed, Adrian!! Industrial archaeology at its best, and delightfully documented. So pleased to see that someone has got the gumption to sort it and put it to good use. It's a pleasant change to see that today's 'diposable culture' has not permeated everywhere!

    Best wishes - - - Richard

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    1. Richard, there were three gumptions. It is a bit different and useful as well.

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  2. Amazing to me that you got it working.

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    1. John, old machines can usually be started. It is in good condition runs with no black smoke and starts easily now.

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  3. They don't build them like that one any more! Great work and great post!

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    1. Marie, I wish they did. Big turbines and marine diesels are still beautifully built but smaller stuff is thrown together to be thrown away.

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  4. These photos are the treasure, Adrian - rich in colour, line, texture and overall in-your-face beautiful. What a great series. I'm in awe of your photographic eye, not to mention your skill with the camera. McGregor

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    1. Karen, HDR from a single image. HDR suits old machinery.

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  5. great that you get it working again adn your close up shots of it are class.

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    1. Margaret, it is a wonder of a machine.

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  6. "It does need a bit of a clean up..." A masterly piece of understatement Adrian.

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    1. John, yes it is full of wildlife.

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  7. Lister made some great engines and they a factory close to here.

    peter

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    1. Peter, they are wonderful engines. Not much to go wrong and they last for years.

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  8. Brilliant find. It takes me back to my youth.

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    1. Graham, yes very exciting. It's a little gem.

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  9. Buenas joyas Adrian. A Paco, mi marido, le gustan mucho estos motores. Trabajó en ellos hace mucho tiempo ;)
    Un abrazo.

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    1. Laura, que sí, que son una joya de un motor.

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  10. Industrial archaeology! I like that phrase! It's quite apt. How did the bird get into the fuel tank, I wonder. I wonder how long he'd been there.... Beautifully documented, Adrian!

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    1. Bill, I have no idea but the air cleaner had a Wrens nest in it. No Wrens fortunately.

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  11. I'm sure it is a thing of beauty and give thanks that it found a loving home.

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    1. Pauline, it is amazing what turns up.

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  12. I absolutely adore these textures you captured. So much to see!

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. They are fake HDR processed from a single image in Nik filters these are now free and worth a look.
      Nik Filters

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  13. A bit of spit and polish and the jobs a good'n.
    Excellent photos...[;o)

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    1. Trevor it will get a pressure wash and a new or another exhaust and be grateful.

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  14. I guess that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Personally, I'd be happier if you posted pictures of buxom Swedish girls in shower cubicles. My brother in France is a bit like you. He swoons over all things mechanical and understands how they work too!

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    1. YP, I have always liked machines. This does look a bit grim but is quite advanced for it's age.

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  15. Isn't it great when you find something like this and with a bit of TLC, spit and polish away it goes. Great find.

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    1. Lynda, it made my day. The dogs were helping and despite a wash still smell of diesel.

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  16. Hmm. One man's treasure is another man's...well, never mind. I'm glad you're having such fun, Adrian.

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    1. Frances, I hope junk wasn't the word unspoken.

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  17. That natural feel of the machine:)

    amazing pictures

    http://inthebothv.blogspot.ae/

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    1. Shilpa, good to see you had a look.

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