ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Monday, 19 June 2017

BABY LADY.

I found this little creature yesterday. It had me baffled but I asked on iSpot and a knowledgeable lady suggested a Striped Ladybird larva. I think I now have a positive ID.
Here are it's pictures.




I am almost certain it's a Pine Ladybird larva; Exochomus quadipustulatus. The adults are black and have four red spots as the name suggests. However some only have two spots. I'll keep an eye out for a grown up one.
I have one photograph to finish off this post and it's an entire Sabre Wasp. I took the 100mm macro lens out as the MP-E65mm can't fit a whole one in.

21 comments:

  1. Amazing macro shots. I can't help identifying it but I'm really amazed at the sharpness and details. Great work!

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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  2. Mersad, insects are fascinating.

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  3. I cannot recall ever seeing (and definitely never identifying) a ladybird larva. As for the wasp I've never seen one of those either. Beautifully captured.

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    1. Graham, these are difficult to spot but an interesting little creature.

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  4. Beautiful indeed. Your lens opens up a whole other world, Adrian.

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    1. Marie, I'm in full insect mode now. It's hot as hell here.

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  5. Looks good for Pine Ladybird Adrian. Just need to find the adult now...I guess you've got plenty of Pines to look through?...[;o)

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    1. Trevor thousands of the things. I'll have a look in the new plantation as I suspect the adults live in the canopy. A good blow may fetch some down.

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  6. whatever it is its very interesting looking. excellent macro shots

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    1. Felicia, I am lucky to have an excellent lens and camera.

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  7. You say it's as hot as hell there - just my luck to leave Scotland on 17th after a week of clouds, wind, and rain, and a total of not much more than 10 hours of sunshine for the week!

    It is strange that one sees so many ladybirds, but very few of their nymphs. Great images!

    Best wishes - - Richard

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    1. Sorry - meant to ask about those bits on the fronds of the leaves - is it some sort of fern with spores?

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    2. Richard, the nymphs are very tiny. I usually sit down on a stump or log and tune in. When they move I spot them.
      The fern is bracken. They are it's spores, in a while they will ripen to a dark brown colour. If you pick a piece an pop it in slightly damp paper you can make a pretty spore print. You can do the same with gilled fungi but have to try and get paper that contrasts with the spore colour.

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    3. Thanks for that fascinating info, Adrian!

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    4. In should read on slightly damp paper.

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  8. I had no idea that Ladybird Larva looked like that

    Mollyx

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    1. Molly they are all of similar form but colour, size and hairiness vary.

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  9. Interesting bug. I didn't know that larvae could have legs. I always thought they were squishy worm like things.

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    1. Rhonda, most do. They go through several stages called instars, A never ending source of wonder.

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