ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Sunday, 20 May 2018

SOME MORE.

I got in a real tangle yesterday, I suspect I was over excited with the big wedding. 
I started drawing a spring. What a job, Bezier curves are always a bit of a problem so I switched to B-Spline which in theory ought to be easier. There is very little difference as I was drawing in 2D. I tried lots of control points and just a few but it looked a right dogs breakfast no matter what I did. Two hours of this nonsense and I gave up and just used arcs and joined them up.
I then had a bit of bother cutting the four holes for the mounting bolts. I assumed in my ignorance that if I popped cylinders through all three springs then asked Mr Boolean nicely to subtract the former from the latter then all would be perfect.   Master Boolean was having non of it, I guess the wedding was affecting him. Eventually I did them one at a time and I'm very happy with a truly wonderful spring.
Here is a bit of video showing the rough attempt and the final result when, about the time of the grand wedding consummation, I eventually got my Booleans all in a row.
I am pleased with this, never thought I'd get there but by magic I did. You will notice if you watch full screen and pause the video that all the edges are sharp. It is easy to either fillet or chamfer them but it adds loads of geometry and slows the job down; though how much slower it could get is difficult to imagine. I'll just write on the drawings "Break Edges". All self respecting engineers would unless instructed otherwise, they value their digits.
On with the forks now and a friction damper to go with the spring.
Have fun.

10 comments:

  1. Another nice job Adrian, I bet you're proud of that?
    As you say 'break edges' is a matter of course, and I've seen it interpreted in many different ways, and some better than others!! However, I can't help thinking that all those edges would need a decent radius on them to help eleviate any chance of stress fractures!...[;o)

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    1. Trevor both proud and relieved. It looks as if it was done by someone who knows what they are doing. I'll do one with a round edge and make a nice video for the next one if I manage to get any further.

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  2. I have never got my Booleans all in a row. Truth be told, I have never even been able to find even one of my Booleans. Are they somewhere near the testicles?

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    1. Afraid not Bob.
      Boolean algebra is named after a chap called Boole. He died a long time ago but married Everest's daughter. The Everest who surveyed India not the double glazing chap. I guess he was a philosophical mathematician. I try and be philosophical when using his invention.

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    2. I knew that. I was pulling your leg.

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  3. Ahh, Professor Ward, please can I have an inivitation to come and see the finished machine? - it looks as if it will be rather colourful!

    Do I take it that that famous place in the Himalayas is named after his attempt to get his leg over with said lady? Quite ambitious if he was already dead!

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    1. Richard, I think professor is stretching things. This is a dream or nightmare and will only ever be a virtual machine.
      Everest the mountain is named after the surveyor. The Nepalese call it something else.

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    3. My Everest comment was, like Bob, me pulling your leg! i.e. Did Boole attempt to "mount (miss) Everest"

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    4. Richard, I have to take Boole seriously though why I don't know. The whole project is a laugh.

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