ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Friday, 15 May 2020

THE LAST ONE OF THESE.

Another busy day. I popped over to the horses this morning for a chat and to look at a muck sweeper engine that was being naughty. Got the engine sorted quick sticks. I heard some news, one lot good and the other bad. The good news is that a local engineering firm has recruited some more staff. Most folk want to work with the exception of those that get paid full whack for doing nothing and nobody but the government wants them anyway. The bad news is that the chap who keeled over outside Sainsbury's ten days ago was dead. Good job my services weren't required it would have dropped my success rate to fifty/fifty. I thought he looked 90% dead when I offered to help. I wonder if he will go down as a BatFlu statistic? A pound to a sticky bun he will and in a way they would be correct as if he hadn't had to wait outside in the cold he could have turned his toes up in a nice warm shop or possibly not at all. 
Mammals and plants die, we are mammals so we die. I really struggle to get to grips with the current obsession with death. Banging pots and pans is dafter than the ancients. I guess we will start having to sacrifice virgins. Good luck with that round here. Maybe the first born son would do. 

I think I may have sorted this smoke simulation. What do you think? It is still far from perfect but I've stopped it hammering the computer to death and with a larger CPU could do the job both faster and better.

 The pulse banding is not a shock wave it is what posh folk call an undesirable artefact and what I call really bad words. I can get rid of them by playing with density in the volumetric shader but then I lose the swirling as well. It has to be sorted prior to the physics baking stage. This, you will be pleased to know, is the last one of these. I've gone as far as I can with it. For those interested here are a few screen grabs.
 This is the scene set up. The big white thing is the emitter or as they now call it The Inflow.
 The thin blue line is a normal. Their direction is very important as is applying the scale and rotation of meshes/stuff in a scene; do not employ location, the computer likes to know where things are. Mostly normals need to face out, they rarely want to in complex meshes till you tell them but were you to require things/smoke/fluid contained in a box or any other mesh then the normals of the container would have to point inwards. Failure to recognise the importance of normals can cause a vast amount of head scratching and torrents of appalling language.
I think I may have gone a bit OTT with the aerofoil but it was leaking a bit so I gave it plenty of geometry and hence it looks like a hedgehog. It is a very nice aerofoil I am really getting topside of this Bezier business.
That's all for now and have a good weekend. 

8 comments:

  1. Tuff about the chap who popped his clogs. I was very impressed by the smoke stimulation or simulation - hard to tell which really.

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    1. Graham, he was one hell of a size but it's still sad.

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  2. If someone plays with the density in my volumetric shader, I lose the swirling too.

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  3. Sad that the old bloke died, I think I'd much prefer to go in private. The smoke thingy is impressive but I'm afraid all that technology is completely lost on me.

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    1. Pauline, I was asking after him when I met a lady who is a nose....very knowledgeable. She knew about it but said no one knew who he was. Most odd, I wonder what he was doing there.

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  4. Very effective. Even a bit of a vortex building on occasion.

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    1. John, I was beginning to think it would never work. I was reading this which gave me hope for the future of small computers and fluid simulations. TWO MINUTE PAPERS

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