ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Tuesday, 13 May 2014

CHRISTMAS. (13/05/14)

It was damn chilly first thing with a touch of frost on the grass. No wind so not jacket or gloves weather. We had a grand walk watching distant Dippers, Common Sandpipers, gulls various and a lonely Pheasant.

Pheasants are daft birds. It actually walked up to the dogs, they were nonplussed and retreated. Brilliant. I should have got some video. I would have but I don’t have a video camera. By the time I’d got the 5D set up to shoot movies the encounter was over. The dogs were bemused as it wandered past on it’s way. They are so used to diving into undergrowth and hearing the pheasants wings clatter and it’s strident alarm call that I guess because it behaved like a domestic bird a domestic bird it was. They are dogs.

I did lose Molly when she was a month or two old. After an hours searching she emerged from under a goose’s wings with four goslings. The goose had, during her nap in the warm swum into the pond. Moll has been able to swim ever since. She comes to me in times of trouble but I wouldn’t say she is a loyal dog. Alf comes now to a whistle from me…Unless he is trying to catch a Red Deer.

That is an achievement in the training of any terrier……I should be at Crofts or Crufts. I may be. I’ll enter the West Highland Terrors class and learn them to jump through hoops and not run off to speak to other dogs, people, the ice cream man……No that would be a step too far. Not worth the effort just to see Birmingham.

As you may have gathered from the blather I missed the otters today. Nothing new there. I’ve had a bit of trouble with a Robin. So the last three days I’ve carried some suet pellets. He likes those. I’m perched on a wet log with my feet in water he now lets me enter his bit of river bank without kicking off a right racket. I sat for two hours waiting for an otter. Not a ripple on the water. But the Robin was almost a star. Here is the Robin._MG_1822 Not yet you fool I’m still cleaning up.

_MG_1824 Does my bum look big in this? I’m saying nowt but no dear.

_MG_1825   Side view….Perfect, I told it.

_MG_1826   Front view. Front view with a twig. That’s art. I told her.

Even with an acquiescent bird like the Robin I manage to foul up or fowl up. It isn’t hand tame but does recognise me and follow me through the undergrowth to my otter watching log. It even sings above my head and only craps on my jumper now and again.

I have explained to the dogs they can’t come Ottering. They don’t mind if I tell them it’s a Supermarket job I’m on and I take them a walk when I get back.

Have fun. It’s hard being a birder. I’m half tempted to tackle a Lady again.

36 comments:

  1. If you bought your jumpers from M&S, the robin wouldn't crap on them. A jumper covered with robin crap is not the way to hook a wee highland lassie.

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    Replies
    1. I thought M&S only sold cardigans. I struggle pulling at the best of times. Dressing in anything from M&S would only make matters worse.

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    2. To improve your pulling potential may I suggest a visit to "Leslie's" salon in Inverness. Address - 8 Eastgate, Inverness IV2 3NA. They will pamper you and attend to your image and may even suggest some suitable fashion outlets where you'll be able to purchase some cool branded gear. A quick spray of a quality men's perfume - say "Dior Homme Eau For Men" and the ladies will be pursuing you like randy wildebeest.

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    3. Neil, Do you object to my using your nom de plume? I have just purchased 'The Headland' at vast expense so can't afford a haircut and wax. I got my new outfit this winter. Mammut trousers; the ones you can wet and they dry in the wind. Ideal they are for the wander back from the pub when one can't find a letterbox. I also got a new jumper, It was made in Norway and cost more than a sheep. I'll give the perfume a miss. I used to buy it for the Mrs Ward and it costs a fortune. I do purchase Pears Shower soap but it lasts for ages with my one shower a month regime.
      Many thanks for the help. I think I'm pretty well sorted.

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  2. Adrian what is the robin great on.

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  3. You sound happy Adrian ~ that is good.

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    Replies
    1. Carol, it's the weather it is warm and sunny.

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  4. I cannot understand why the first people hear named a thrush a robin. Early British people who came here must not have been up on their birds. They were maybe a bit like your dogs when they didn't recognize a pheasant.

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    1. Red, they must have been ancestors of mine. Even with books I struggle.

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    2. Hey, I do know the correct here to use! What an embarrassing goof.

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  5. That lens is sharp, Adrian!

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    1. Maria, it is good up to around a 100'. I'm very pleased with it.

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  6. Adrian to observe birds and animals life it is so interesting I admire you. I do the same in my little world but I'm not expert about

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    1. Laura, I'm not an expert either. It is good to sit and watch wild birds and animals.

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    2. Yes it is nice, i like it a lot too even observe my dog it's so interesting the animals life!

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    3. Laura, I couldn't live without an animal to look after. They try to look after me as well. I love the smelly, dirty, little devils.

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  7. Poor Molly. And the Red Robin, nice sequence of standing on a branch.

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    1. Bob, I'd rather have seen the otter but the Robin keeps me company while I wait.

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  8. I agree with Maria, that is a very sharp lens. Wonderful close-ups.

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    1. Mersad, it is fine for the money. It's a Canon 100mm-400mm f4.5-f5.6. Im happy with it. It is a bit soft in the corners on the full frame sensor but i usually crop square and use a large aperture so it isn't a problem.

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. Es precioso y lo presentas por delante y por detrás;)
    Buen miércoles.
    Un abrazo

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    Replies
    1. Sí Laura, que estaba bailando para mí.

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  11. A very nice series Adrian!

    Greetings from the Netherlands,
    Gert Jan

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    Replies
    1. Gert, Thank you. I got something to show for sitting for an hour or more.

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  12. First off, you wouldn't want to actually tackle a Lady. Barring that, let your instincts take over. It will all come back to you.

    Please note I said barring that, not baring that.

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    Replies
    1. Bob, I'll consider your wise and thoughtful council.
      Thank you.

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  13. Adrian, I enjoyed the post and the photos, but....Christmas??

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    1. Frances, I was going to explain in the post but forgot. Nobody else seems to read titles so I just left it.
      Robins often feature on Christmas cards. I can never find one near Christmas so thought I'd post early. Sorry if I confused you.

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  14. Replies
    1. Not seen it for two days. I will have a go today but it is a bit dark.

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  15. I'm glad I read through the comments since I was also perplexed by the post title.

    "After an hours searching she emerged from under a goose’s wings with four goslings." I can only imagine how utterly adorable that scene was. :)

    I love the robin pics.. the lighting is wonderful.

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    Replies
    1. Hilary, it was a domestic goose and she was only a few weeks old.

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  16. Who needs Crufts when you have this, nice work.

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  17. Jay, it would be better without the twig but I never got a clear shot.

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