ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Saturday, 20 September 2014

MORE MACRO. (20/09/14)

It was very wet overnight but it’s brightening up now. On our way back from a damp walk I turned a couple of stones over and captured a millipede and a centipede. Neither were much over an inch long but they were very lively so I popped them in the fridge. When I retrieved them an hour or two later they were dead so I won’t do that again._MG_3667   Millipede.

_MG_3660 Centipede.

I also found this Crane fly.

_MG_3656

_MG_3657

_MG_3658 I think this one is Tipula oleracea. It was sitting on the wall with it’s wings folded. These were all taken with the MP-E 65mm lens hand held at magnification from 1X, 3X and 2X.

I’m in macro mode at the moment. I’m sorry if it’s boring but it is good for my hand/eye coordination.

That’s all for today.

29 comments:

  1. Well you are definitely not boring me. In fact I've been really invigorated and have been researching cameras and lenses and flash set-ups again. Whether I will act just yet remains to be seen. I never quite know with me when I will take seize the moment. The problem is that I have a habit of doing that and then not being able to find the time to do what I want amongst all the other things which absorb my time. Keep on marching for a while longer though.....please.

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    1. Graham, my gear is overkill for the Web. But they are impressive at 2'x2'.
      The smaller the sensor the more DOF you will get. There are some cracking cameras out there and many with excellent lenses.
      I am just in having found lots of Red Admirals so that is tomorrows post sorted.

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  2. Great macros Adrian, it would be good to have eyes that could resolve this much detail.

    Shame about those 'pedes popping their clogs..clogs..clogs..clogs..clogs.....! (sorry, I couldn't resist)

    It's possible that the Crane-fly is Tipula paludosa as it's more common at this time of year (May to October)..T.oleracea is more common in May to June....[;o)

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    1. Trevor, I was going for Tipula paludosa but having looked the antenna seem to be the wrong colour. I'm struggling to find pictures at this magnification for comparison.
      I used my sisters fridge but got the wrong bit and froze them. Poor things I feel quite guilty. I've adapted a little dark box so if it's dark they may be happier.
      It is great being able to resolve such beauty.

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    2. You are correct Trevor. I have looked at my blurry images and only the first two segments of the antennae are brown/orange. T. paludosa it is. T. oleracea have three browny orange segments.
      Fun is insectology. For folk to have noticed it confirms that it's not just me who should get out more.

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    3. Adrian, I think sad is the word you're looking for, but what else would we do with our time?...[;o)

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  3. Murderer! My heart bleeds for that poor millipede and the frozen centipede! How could you Adrian? How could you? Sincere condolences to their grieving families and friends.

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    1. YP, I was in a rush and failed to notice it was the freezer I used. My sister wasn't best pleased that I was filling her chilled storage equipment with insects.

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  4. You could sell these for a biology book! :D

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. Mersad, the chance would be a fine thing. They are cropped but not very much so will print well. I'd have to be sure of what they are first. ID is a weakness with me.

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  5. Brilliant macro images, and don't worry, we love 'em.

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    1. Bob, thanks. It's just as well as I got some more yesterday afternoon.

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  6. How could anyone get bored of quality images like this, the Crane Fly looks stunning. Is it true they have strong enough venom to kill a human but no way of delivering? Ricky Gervais said but I think he was joking

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    1. Douglas you're quite safe...Most of the 300+ species of Crane-flies in the UK have no mouth parts or any other means to inject venom, even if they had any.
      Tipula oleracea is the adult stage of the Leather Jacket grub which is a major lawn pest.
      The lack of mouth parts means that they do not eat during the adult stage and their only objective during the two or so days that they live for is to find a mate and reproduce!....[;o)

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    2. Douglas, No they can't bite. I haven't eaten one so I can't say whether they are poisonous.
      Trevor, there are 300+ different species? I really can't imagine identifying them were I to live to be 300.

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    3. I will kick Ricky Gervais next time:-)

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  7. You can stay in macro mode as far as I'm concerned. Insects take on a whole new life when you see such detail.

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    1. Red, I am getting swamped in images. I don't know why it has taken me years to work out a system that is effective. The hit rate is just under 50% now which is acceptable.

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  8. The more invertebrates the better from my point of view.

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    1. John, there are plenty more in the bag. I gaze at them for hours once they are downloaded. Beautiful things with almost endless variety.

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  9. I grieve a little for the millipede, it is a thing of beauty. I guess childhood experiences with centipedes prevents me from appreciating them. Sad. I'm more then happy for you to stay in macro mode.

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    1. Pauline, yes I was very cruel but it was a mistake. I don't know if the violet colour is a result of freezing or it is natural.
      I've just posted some more.

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  10. Macro is never boring and yours are always fascinating. Too bad about the chilled critters. I would have thought they'd do as well as worms. Oh.. now I'm reading back on the comments and see they were actually frozen. Oops. I know that was a boo boo and that you feel badly. Try to think of it as a sacrifice for photographic posterity. They're fabulous images, Adrian.

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    1. Hilary, it on't happen again. I'll see if I can find some early in the morning and focus stack them.

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  11. Replies
    1. The next stpe is to focus stack in the field.

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