ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Sunday, 7 September 2014

SULPHUR TUFT. (07/09/14)

I was out this morning and thought I’d struck gold or at least honey. _MG_3489   These fungi are Sulphur Tuft.  Hypholoma fasciculare. Honey fungus are edible when young and though these aren’t poisonous they taste very bitter. I hunted around for ages trying to find some Honey fungus so that I could compare the two side by side. I couldn’t find any. The flash was playing up so I gave the hot shoe a good scrub with a tooth brush and it’s fine again now. This picture was taken at 2000 ISO. It made me wonder why I bother with the strobe.

_MG_3512 The easy way to tell is to look at the stem which doesn’t have a ring round it on Sulphur Tuft. I did have some pictures of the stem but deleted them by mistake…..Silly me. Here they are, I found them again. I did do a spore print and that is a purple colour not a cream colour as in the Honey Fungus.

_MG_3529     Sulphur Tuft spore print.

I have loads of pictures to sort out but in the meantime have a great week.

28 comments:

  1. That spore print is interesting.

    Saw plenty of fungi this morning. I think it'll be a good autumn for them.

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    1. Keith, spore prints seem quite a good way of differentiating between similar looking fungi. Not for puff balls though as they fire straight up. It should be good it's warm and wet.

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    1. Douglas, I now do three at a time and check at hourly intervals. I dampened the paper as this seems to help. The damn things blow away in the slightest draft. I'll probably have a van full of toadstools next year.

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  3. You're doing well with the spore prints Adrian, I can see a library building here?.
    I went out to a local wood a couple of days ago which has always been good for fungi but, hay ho!, it's been turned into a kids play woods with ropes, obstacle courses and den making areas. The ground has been trashed so no fungi!
    When you've finished sorting your pictures I've got more for sorting than I can cope with at the moment soooo, if you've got a free moment or two...?...[;o)

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    1. Trevor, this post could have been better. I was watching the GP at the same time and kept losing the plot.
      The things they vandalise for children. It's a sin.

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  4. Great shot you got from the print. But I love the laying on the ground as well, neatly tucked in with the grass.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. Mersad, it's a dirty job but fun trying to ID them.

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  5. Adriaan First the tree is my favorite.

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    1. Thanks Bas. Not bad considering the ISO was so high.

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  6. Brilliant photos of the Sulpher Tuft. More mushroms please?

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    1. Bob, I am going to Onich today then Glencoe for four days mushrooming.

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  7. How do you do a spore print Adrian? Sounds interesting.

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    1. Carol, I spray a bit of white paper so it is damp. then lay three fungi on it. Some print after an hour and most seem to give a print by three hours if they are mature, ferns do it as well. I found that if the paper is dry the spores blow about all over the place.

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  8. I'm glad to see nothing has changed in my absence. I will have to scroll back to see where you are now.

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    1. Pauline glad to see you back safe and sound. I'm going to Fort William today.

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  9. I just close my eyes when it comes to fungus. Dad had us pick mushrooms when we were kids. He knew where they were and told us to go out and pick them. I remember them being delicious. Today , I wonder how Dad knew what the good mushrooms were. At the time I thought there was only one kind of mushroom. Now I realize there are thousands of different fungi.

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    1. Red, I find them fascinating. There are lots of edible ones, plenty that don't taste nice and some that make you ill.Most have to be cooked. Some will kill you but that applies to most plants.

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  10. Hi! This kind of mushrooms seem to be like a our Chidini, but they don'´t have a ring?

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    1. We call the one with the ring Honey Fungus. This one doesn't taste nice Laura.

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  11. I love the fungi (and the spore picture), but as for giving shoes a hot scrub, I'd give that a miss.

    Have a good week yourself.

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  12. Frances, I always dread having to clean the camera shoe. I hate cleaning my teeth with WD40 on my toothbrush.

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  13. The spore prints are coming out really well.

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    1. Yes John. I do three at a time now on slightly damp paper. I lift the first one at an hour and so on. They seem to take about three hours. I'm going to try one on glycerine dampened paper. If I do them on dry paper the spores either blow away or smudge.

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  14. Beautiful print, I like the isolated mushroom image.

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  15. Maria, I have enjoyed doing spore prints. I need to refine the system to stop the spores moving about.

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  16. Muchas setas hay ya por ahí ,aquí aún no han salido, a ver si empieza a llover y salen. Ten cuidado con ellas si las comes.
    Un abrazo.

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    1. Laura, estos no son agradables para comer. Tienen un sabor muy amargo. Son buenos para mirar.

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