ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Tuesday, 21 July 2015

AN EXCELLENT MORNING. (21/07/15)

It seems weeks since we have had a good sunny calm day. I have spent most of the morning sitting watching insects. I have lots to sort out but I’ll make a start with this.

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_V0G9863                                                          COMMON GREEN CAPSID BUG NYMPH  Lygocoris sp.

_V0G9888        LEAFHOPPER. Euscelis incisus

I like the way their eyes are a perfect match with the rest of them. I will get a head on shot one day but they always jump away.

_V0G9892        WHITE-TAILED BUMBLE BEE. Bombus hortorum.

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I am not sure what this is. It is big and slow. I thought it was one of the Conopid Flies but looking again it has longish antennae so I suspect it is a wasp. If it is, it’s a friendly wasp as I had it on my finger and turned it round to face the camera. It didn’t seem to mind so a very nice insect. I have looked at it large and only see one pair of wings. This is a complicated business. JOHN has identified this as a Mason Wasp, Ancistrocerus trifasciatus.

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_V0G9874            MALE HOVERFLY. Syrphus ribesii.

That’s all for today.

30 comments:

  1. Hey. Hugs to Mol and Alf. (My Molly isn't doing well today. She had a stroke yesterday :( but she is resting well now.)

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    1. R. Mac, give molly a big hug. It always looks very hot there for a dog. Let us hope she makes a full recovery. Nothing worse to deal with than a sick animal.

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  2. I feel like I want to go outside to see what insects I can find...but it's too windy! These are wonderful images!

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    1. Tina, I can usually find some shelter here. A bit of wind helps as I hold the plant and rest the camera on my arm. They don't seem to notice a bit of movement if there is a breeze.

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  3. Replies
    1. Thanks Margaret. I just wish there was a way to increase DOF.

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  4. As the cycling London teachers might have said, "Well done Adrian! Very good work! Merit star awarded." Though Father Christmas would have said, "Come and sit on my knee sonny jim!...Now what do you want Santa to bring you?"

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    1. YP, I must admit when I clapped my eyes on Santa I did think he looked a bonny bugger but sitting chatting he was quite normal......by my standards.

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    1. Frances, no it isn't and unlike the common wasp hornets aren't naturally aggressive. They will defend food and their nest but when they are just wandering about they are fine.

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  6. A grand selection.
    For your wasp have a look at
    http://www.naturespot.org.uk/species/ancistrocerus-trifasciatus
    markings look very similar to me

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    1. Thanks John, that looks like it. It is an impressive wasp. I'll amend the post now.

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    2. I hope we are correct! It certainly seems to match.
      Having solved your mystery, hopefully, I am tearing my hair out trying to identify a fly I just found swimming in Penny's water dish - at least I would be if I had any hair long enough to grab hold of. Post to follow shortly.

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    3. John, It looks about right.

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  7. What can I say, this is one of the best, thanks Adrian.

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    1. Ta Bob, plenty of stuff getting about now.

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  8. Wow, you really get up close and personal with the insects! Fantastic macro shots.

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    1. Linda, they were being good today except for a horse fly which gave me a nasty bite and didn't have the grace to stay for a photo.

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  9. Never thought I'd say I like the look of a fly. But I do admire the fly in the last two shots. No, it's probably the photo I admire, how I can see the pretty markings on its wings.

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    1. Pauline, give it time and you will be a fly fan. Not Clegs and Midges maybe but most others are fine. When you get to Lewis and think it's going dark at lunch time it will just be the Midges blocking out the sun. This assumes you are there on one or other of the annual sunny days.

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  10. Now the hover fly is a great looking specimen. It's interesting the way to wings are placed.

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    1. Red, hoverflies usually perch with their wings spread. Many are bee and wasp mimics and it is one way of telling them apart.

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  11. You certainly have introduced me to a foreign world.

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    1. John, I have had an interest for years but this is the first year I have managed to get reasonable results from the MP-E 65mm lens.

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  12. Some fantastic detail in the images Adrian, glad summer finally arrived north of the border even if it was possibly for just a short period:-)

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    1. Douglas, it looks as if we'll have two good days then Friday it is forecast to hail.

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  13. The midges have yet to find their overcoats so it's pretty quiet here on Lewis at the moment! Great shots, Adrian.

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    1. John, it's cool here but dry. I'm just in from our first walk, nothing much about without raking through the undergrowth.

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