ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Sunday, 12 July 2015

STUCK TOGETHER SUNDAY. (12/07/15)

I decided as it’s a Sunday to stick some pictures together. Like mosaic Monday but a day early. The Puss Moth Larva is still growing and was quite lively this morning. I wish there were a couple of dozen of them and not just the one as I could then try for a focus stack at 4X magnification.PML11

There are subtle changes and it is a bit bigger than it was last time I posted a picture of it.

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Here it is as it was four days ago. Light and processing are identical so it’s turning both bigger, greener and it’s markings are much more clearly defined. I can’t wait for it to change into a clown faced larva. I’m thinking of popping some bird proof netting round it.

Yesterday I managed to get some shots of this pretty little chap.

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It’s a Muscid Fly, Phaonia pallida. I have a few blurry shots of it facing the camera but it is very wary and flies off at the touch of my finger on the shutter button. There are dozens about at the moment so I will see if I can find a dead or a dozy one.

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The Hoverflies have been conspicuous by their absence for the last few weeks but are back again.

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A female Yellow Dung Fly sucking the juice out of her brunch.

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I found this little grub on a Dock leaf. It’s living under a membrane but wriggles about when I poke it with my finger. I can’t find any reference to it on the internet. I ought to have brought it home and waited to see what it turned into. I’ll pop out and have a look for another one.

A hen died last night so I’m away to bury it. I’ll do it proud. I could do with one of those hats the male royals wear with scrambled egg on and a gun carriage but it will have to make do with a wheelbarrow and being dumped in a hole.

Have a good week

36 comments:

  1. Oh dear poor chook. The life of a farmer Adrian. Lovely clear pics as always.

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  2. Tick. And more ticks. (OK, I know they are not ticks....)

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    1. No John, Ticks are revolting things. Plenty about at the moment.

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    2. PS. I have plenty of images of engorged ones but have yet to find a hungry one. I keep combing bracken for one but with no luck so far.

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  3. Puss puss puss. Brilliant images Adrian.

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  4. Replies
    1. Millie, I'm glad you popped by for a look.

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  5. The Puss Moth larva is looking good Adrian, it'll be interesting to see how it progresses....does it stay on the same leaf?
    Lovely shots of the flies, they look good close up!

    I somehow don't think it would be proper to be adorned in scrambled eggs while you're giving that hen a decent send off, I hope the other hens will be giving it a guard of honour?

    Check out leaf miners for the mystery grub...you're into a whole new world there!!...[;o)

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    1. Trevor, the Puss Moth Larva is on it's fourth willow leaf but one wasn't very big.
      They are pretty flies. I'm still after picture wing flies and a little cracker that is all fluorescent blue even it's eyes.
      Isn't scrambled egg what posh army and navy folk call that gold decoration on their hats?

      Thanks for the leaf miner tip. I didn't realise the membrane was part of the leaf. I thought it was part of the grub or whatever. There don't seem to be that many that like dock leaves so I'll try and identify it. There are times when I get dizzy trying to sort all these insects out. Why can't they all just pop out of an egg?

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  6. The Puss Moth has some great markings when viewed from above. Not a massive fan of flies but the level of detail is astonishing.
    Why did you have to bury the chuck rather then placing it in the pot?

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    1. Douglas, they are old layers and tough as boots. I did think of boiling it up for the dogs but it would have stunk the truck out. These hens roam about the place and can fly so not the sort of chicken I'm capable of chewing. Plus they need killing and bleeding out for the pot.
      Most flies bar the little black storm flies are very attractive close up. I like the MP-E lens but working distance is only an inch or so and they get frightened. Oddly the strobes don't seem to worry them.

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    2. PS. Douglas I have become friends with the hens. I leave the run gate open every other day so they can have a wander. If it blows shut then I can hear them calling me to open it. If I want an early night most of them will go to bed if I call "Chuck, chuck, chuck come on bedtime girls." I usually have a couple to catch and bundle in but even the awkward ones crouch down to be picked up. They are great companions even if food motivates their friendship.
      I hope nobody hears me.....I might get locked up.

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  7. Clever camouflage colours on that larva - so far. (I just looked up other images of it...)

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    1. Monica, it seems to have got used to me. It used to rear up but now tends to carry on doing what it was doing prior to me arriving.

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  8. You know Adrian your posts are worth it for the craic alone!

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    1. Graham, I'm just in from rowing up a hay field for the baler. Like driving on a mountain side at a hundred miles an hour. These young machine drivers don't hang around but rowing hay is still quicker than baling I finished first. I had to cause he can't bale till I've rowed the hay up. It's been a long day and I put the wrong date on my mosaick or stick together.
      The hen was buried with the help of a little backhoe digger. I quite enjoy modern farming but I still must have walked miles today. The Proclaimers knew something I didn't when I came to Auchtermuchty. Once out of the town it's all up hill and down hill. They didn't walk 500 miles but it just seems like it.
      I ought to buy a GOPRO camera then I could have made a post out of today. Not to worry I think I have.

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  9. Very interesting critter!

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    1. Bill, I am no expert but JOHN is. He told me what it was when it was a hatchling. It will change again then give up for the winter and hide as a pupatier or something like that. Then it will become a Puss Moth next year and flap about being annoying while I try to read a book. You ought to show us some American ones.

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  10. I like "Stuck together Sunday." You could create a whole new meme! :) Awesome pics of the bugs!

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    1. Linda, I don't do memes. Firstly I'm far too disorganised and secondly they tend to attract folk who leave comments like "Very Nice". I much prefer folk to say why is half that insect blurry? I can then explain how hard I try to get a living fly that doesn't speak much English parallel to the sensor. You must have the same problem with Jed Bush and Donald Trump or Donald Fart as he is known here. He blows hot air and talks from his nether regions.

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  11. Replies
    1. Andrew, I think so. I like birds and mammals but am getting into these insects. I may have to sell the long lens as I'm useless with it. I really would like to build a camera with a finite 20X lens on and then get enough light to see what's what.

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  12. You got some awesome shots of the muscid fly. You did lots of hard work on this post. Now I thought you'd do a post mortem on the chicken? What caused the death?

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    1. Red, thanks. I have a dozen terrible ones as well. Don't know what it died of, I wouldn't have a clue had I had a look. Hens just die from time to time. Stagnation of the lungs would be my guess.

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  13. If the hen only died on Saturday night you could have surely plucked it and roasted it for your Sunday dinner. Waste not, want not as my old Nana used to say.

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    1. No thanks, I don't know what it died from.

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  14. Replies
    1. Thank you Linda. The lens has a lot to do with them.

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  15. Hi Adrian. Sorry to hear of your loss. My daughter used to keep chickens. I was amazed at just how companionable and intelligent they were. So it won't be me that comes to lock you up!

    I must confess to spending time trying to sort out what your mystery larva whas when you first showed it. Although I'd thought about it being a 'first-stage' specimen, it never occurred to me that it might turn out to be the wonderful feisty creature that a Puss Moth caterpillar is. If you can follow it right through to moth stage you're in for a treat!

    Enjoying your macro work still - but what happened to your themed approach to blogging !! ;-}

    Best wishes - - - - - Richard

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    1. Richard, hens are relaxing birds and yes they do have individual characters.
      I think it will pupate over winter. I just hope it makes it to the final instar.
      The disparity theme. I'll do one later as I have enough for a post.

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  16. I'm looking forward to seeing how the Puss Moth larvae develops. Was Sunday lunch not an option for the Chicken?

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    1. Adam, I just hope nothing eats it.
      No if you want to eat them they have to be bled out. They would taste horrible full of congealed blood.

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  17. Uhh.. Your macros about fly!! Like a moment from The Fly horror film. Brilliant work Adrian!

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    1. Kovacs, they are beautiful. No horrors here.

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