ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Monday, 18 July 2016

I WISH. (18/07/16)

I wish I knew more about all the little creatures. I was out this morning and decided I would concentrate on the insects that shelter under Sycamore leaves.
This I found under a Beech leaf as I arrived at a Beech tree first, it stayed like this for ages which was just as well as the auto flash exposure refused to be good. It is rare it fails but I set it to manual at half duration left and a quarter to the right.
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It’s a caterpillar but I don’t recognise it and have very little information on caterpillars or anything else for that matter.
This is a Red Spider Mite and on a Sycamore leaf stalk.
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This is another don’t know but I do have lots of pictures of it scampering hither and thither.
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Now we get onto the really interesting ones.
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This bug must be a politician nymph as it is outside doing bugger all but trying to look good whilst wearing a Hi-Viz jacket. Isn’t it stunning; I can think of a few hundred politicians that are either stunned or need stunning. Amber Rudd is a stunned example she always reminds me of a deer caught in the truck headlights.
I was sure these were Midges but now I don’t know. They have antennae but not fronded ones and they also have what look like breathing tubes. I assumed when I first saw them that the poor thing had lost a leg but after a quick count it had it’s full complement of appendages. They could be Lacewings (Chrysopidae sp). I don’t think they are big enough and I’ve never noticed Pipes on a Lacewing. There were about fifty of them spread between a couple of adjacent Sycamore leaves but I looked under several more and didn’t see any others. the two pipes are called siphunculi and apparently only aphids have them. I now have to find out why. This is the Common Sycamore Aphid, Drepanosiphum platanoidis. Once again thanks to Trevor for almost getting there and for pointing me in the right direction.
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I did try for a side view but I couldn’t manage one as for some reason they objected to the camera when it was anywhere but overhead. I have marked the little pipe things. These are surprisingly difficult insects to see and focus on.
I may get out for some flower pictures later but it looks as if the sun will be a bit bright and I still haven’t replaced the umbrella I use to shade them.

19 comments:

  1. You continue to amaze with these photos. The red spider mite is my favourite...not something I ever thought I'd say.

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    1. Marie, I am less amazed than completely baffled. Most of these will print at around a metre on the longest side. Much bigger if I drop the resolution to around 180 px/in. I will think about getting a couple done but quality prints are very expensive.

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  2. Given that the ordinary Scottish Midge has a wingspan of 2mm and the Highland Midge a wingspan of 1.4mm that's one helluva good magnification.

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    1. Graham, I was thinking more of the non-biting midges like the fungus midge. These aren't very big if you ignore their wings. I would gues under 4mm long. These are taken at 3X magnification on the sensor and not cropped heavily.

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  3. Nice selection here Adrian.
    Can't help with the caterpillar...have a look here
    http://www.wildlifeinsight.com/british-caterpillar-galleries/british-moth-caterpillar-galleries/ you might be lucky?...good luck!

    I think the last two might be Aphids, had a quick look...Euceraphis punctipennis (European Birch Aphid) ...is the nearest I could find, still not sure though!....[;o)

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    1. Thanks Trevor they are Drepanosiphum platanoidis, I don't know why but I didn'yt think of aphids. This article explains everything about them except the tube like things.

      Common Sycamore Aphid

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    2. Trevor not found the caterpillar yet but thanks for the link. I will now set to and look for the fluorescent little blighter.

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  4. Politician Nymph! A coffee sprayer for me this morning!

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    1. Bill so your lot do it as well. Our now ex-chancellor used to spend months wandering around in workers gear but I never saw him working once. Plonkers one and all. I'm still trying to find out what it really is.

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  5. Nice macro captures of these tiny insects! I especially like the little caterpillar in your first photo.

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  6. No surprise to say I haven't got a clue what they are. But they are really well photographed. I'm going to have to look under my sycamores and see what I can find.
    If you wish to see a politician in permanent state of surprise, check Nicky Morgan out, she even looks like an Owl :-)

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    1. Douglas. They are tiny. Nicky Morgan is who i was thinking of . I think she got the sack the other day.

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  7. A cracking series of photos Adrian.

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    1. Thanks john, I'm having fun with macro this year.

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  8. More woderfully inspiring macro work, Adrian. I particularly like your politician nymph!

    Best wishes - - Richard

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    1. Richard, I enjoy finding the tiny creatures. I can spend ages gazing at them.

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  9. Buena selección de macros !!!
    Un abrazo.

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    1. Laura, estoy feliz de que les guste.

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