ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Friday, 7 July 2017

LARCH LADYBIRD.

A while ago I posted some pictures of Ladybird larva. Experience has forced me to re-access my identifying them as Pine Ladybird larva. I have looked high and low for a Pine Ladybird without success, I have found several Larch Ladybirds hence the correction.
The Larva.


Larch Ladybird; Aphidecta obliterata. Beautiful little creatures and they take the trouble to add a 'W' for Ward onto their pronotum. A much appreciated gesture. 
I've had early morning fun watching Ringlet Butterflies.




Aphantopus hyperantus.

Bombus lapidarius; A Red Tailed Bumble Bee drone. Eyes bee seeing you.

18 comments:

  1. Stunning photos as always, Adrian.

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    1. Frances it's fun snapping them. I now have a system I'm happy with and only about 10% end up in the trash. Perhaps I ought to make that 50% but that's the job for an editor.

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  2. Spectacular! The butterfly is my favourite!

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    1. Marie, the butterflies are sociable early morning,

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  3. I can't believe that I've spent several weeks under the misapprehension that I'd been looking at a pine ladybird larva. I'm gutted. I've lost faith. Well actually I had after the first paragraph but several paragraphs and pictures and a cognac later my faith is restored. It's 10pmish in Devon and I'm sitting overlooking and listening to a river and watching a Heron catch its evening meal. I photographed a Heron in the same spot years ago and blogged about it. I must look it up. The butterfly macros are inspirational.

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    1. Sorry Graham, I ought to have realised that people would be devastated.
      You have a good time in the sunny South West.

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  4. How about that!...your very own Wardybird! Nice find and great images, are they eggs it's guarding in the first image?

    Like those close ups of the Ringlet...[;o)

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    1. Ta Trevor. No, they are the spore thingies under bracken leaves.

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    2. Sorry Adrian, I should have said the first War..ladybird image!...[;o)

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    3. Could be, I thought it was dead at first but I gave it a poke and it scampered off.

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  5. More wonderful macro work, Adrian. Never seen that ladybird species before. You'd have thought they might have called it wardii rather than obliterata - what sort of a name is that!

    Are those water droplets shining brightly in the head shots of the Ringlet? Seems to be a fantastic year for Ringlets this year!

    Best wishes - - - Richard

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    1. Richard, I would have called it wardie but suspect I'm a few hundred years too late.
      Ringlets appear to be very localised. Here they breed in one patch of long grass about 200m by 5m.

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  6. Another spectacular collection of macros Adrian. Great stuff. Interesting ladybird and very different in appearance to the usual run of the mill reds.

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    1. Thanks John, I haven't seen a normal one here yet. These aren't common and being small and brown easily missed.

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  7. larva of ladybug are not wellknown ! they are not beautiful but
    very useful in the nature !
    you did amazing macros Adrian

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    1. Marty, they are what they are. I am ugly on the outside and pretty in the middle.
      I love finding new insects and sharing them. All Ladybird larva look similar to this one. Some are very attractive but all I find are boring ones.

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