ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Wednesday, 29 August 2018

SEVEN SPOTS.

This post is for John at MIDMARSH JOTTINGS. A couple of times he has bemoaned the scarcity of ladybirds. I have never seen so many and these are what the combine has caught from a few acres of barley.

Here is one. It is standing in the dirty barley from the end rig. There are thousands more an impressive sight.



It is looking to be a successful year after the disaster which was last year.
I have got some video titles done and a bit of footage so hopefully a harvest video will appear in the near future.

16 comments:

  1. That's Great! So glad to see they are not beaten by the harlequin beetle yet!

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    1. Kate, I have seen the occasional harlequin but not for a years or so.

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  2. Thanks for the mention and link.
    When I think about it I have seen little in the way of greenfly as well. Not just the really bad weather last Spring reducing their numbers here but a lack of food source as well.
    Great to see they are doing well in the wild and wooly north.
    If I find red speckles in my sliced bread or beer I'll know where they came from ;)

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    1. John, there are lots of cereal beetles so I guess they are eating them.
      I can see a few vegans getting a shock when they crack an overpriced bottle of craft beer.

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  3. Love the close-up shot in the beginning, but once you zoom out it gets really interesting. Great pictures!

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    1. Thanks Mersad. All taken with a 100mm macro lens. Not a favourite of mine but it does focus to infinite.

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  4. That's amazing, Adrian! I see there are a few other grebblies in there too. Can't beat a full-bodied pint for flavour, so should be OK.

    Here, it's Hornets and shieldbugs that seem to be having a bumper year.

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    1. Richard I have noticed them all summer but never dreamed there would be this many. The other insects are earwigs, cereal beetles and the occasional ground beetle.

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  5. 7-spot ladybirds seem to be doing well around this neck of the woods this year as well Adrian, I've also noticed the numbers of 22-spot are good too. That's in contrast to the numbers of other insects, and caterpillars, wich seem to be well down on previous years... it's the normal cycle of good and bad years, I guess?...[;o)

    I hope you've collected all those up and set them free?...[;o)

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    1. Trevor I haven't seen anything new this summer and not much of anything. Even Dung flies are scarce.
      Yes they have all been collected and released with the exception of three. The tractor ran over one and a naughty hen ate two.

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  6. Ladybirds are something I don't see much of here either, I'm trying to plant insect friendly plants in my garden to entice them more.

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    1. Amy, Aphids love roses and prefer the really expensive ones. Ladybirds and Wasps eat Aphids which is a bit sad as I find Aphids attractive and their little breathing pipe things fascinating.

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  7. Replies
    1. Margaret, I would have taken more time but was distracted by the quantity of them.

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  8. I always remember my Mum telling us about the year of the plague of ladybirds in The Lake District. I don't recall seeing them here I have to say.

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    1. Graham, combining stopped today as a drive belt disintegrated itself. New one arriving tomorrow morning so I'll try for some proper Ladybird shots. These were just snapped in a hurry as I didn't realise folk would be interested. I hasn't made the news but then they are more interested in transgender weirdos and cultural inappropriation; whatever that is. David Lammy was banging on about it but he's as thick as mince so I didn't really listen.
      I noticed them in vast numbers on a field of oats near Carnbo. They either fly away or die which is a pity. The grain is coming in at around 12% moisture so at least they won't have to go through the drier.

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