ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Monday, 16 June 2014

TWISTY. (16/06/14)

16-06-2014 14-30-55   Tomorrow morning I will set off early and wend my wyndy way north. If the weather is good then I’ll stop for pictures at Loch Assynt and Kylesku. I may break the journey at Scourie as if there are Skuas and Divers around I can get reasonably close to them there. I don’t like Scourie but I’ll suffer it to see Skuas. The journey is about fifty or sixty miles but takes for ever as the roads start off narrow and twisty then get wider and twisty and finally end up very narrow. It is a beautiful road if I’m blessed with good weather.

I’ll be a bit sad to leave Clachtoll. It has varied views and habitat and I’ve not even looked at the fresh water lochs just up the hill. I am thinking of calling in on my way back south.

_MG_2365

_MG_2363   I will always remember the Eiders here. Yesterday the cove I usually see them in was deserted as people were partying on the beach. I found them about a mile north. How does she get the tiny chicks to swim that far? I guess she just drifts them up on the tide.

_MG_2360   This marsh lies close to the cliffs and the sea. I thought it might be alive with birds and dragonflies but there was no sign of either. Maybe I’m a bit early. It’s a good place, the midges are a pest but there are dry rocks to sit on so apart from piles it isn’t too much of a problem sitting and waiting here.

_MG_2359   Ringed Plovers.

_MG_2355  Tiny Frog, as I said yesterday there were hundreds of these and in the absence of a Heron I hope there still are.

_MG_2350 Shags or Cormorants sitting on Split Rock. I’ve been here ten days and never seen more than two. There are lots of Divers fishing here so maybe they are a mixture.

_V0G3613 Lady’s Bedstraw and a baby Frog Hopper beetle living in the foam.

_MG_2343  I have looked everywhere to identify this tenacious little plant. It is sitting next to a 5p coin. I wonder is it a Sundew?

_MG_2378   Thanks Clachtoll. Ta ta and see you again soon.

26 comments:

  1. The unidentified plant looks very much like the drosera aliciae, i.e. a sundew, sat on my windowsill if that helps. Although as it's a bog plant I wouldn't have expected to see it in quite such stony ground so maybe it isn't.

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    1. Mark, I think you are correct. It also grows in sand close to the sea so is salt tolerant. This is growing on a bit of cliff.
      For most of the time here the weather is so damp that i suspect it thinks it is living in a bog.

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  2. I think it's a bit small for sundew, although there's certainly a similarity.

    Boy voyage, Adrian. Keep in touch.

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    1. Frances, this is one of many tiny plants that I can't identify. I love the tiny flowers.
      I ought to ask the three people a couple of pitches down as they know everything. They can identify Whales and Dolphins from a splash so far out at sea that the Minkie, Orca, whatever is closer to Stornoway than it is to me. It could be worse they might have ended up next door.

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  3. It sounds like you have enjoyed your time there Adrian, great post as always.

    peter

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    1. Peter, it is one of the best places. I will come back late August when in quietens down a bit.

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  4. Hi Adrian Yes it was a lovely place but I am sure you will be back. Love the ringed Plover. Did they have a chick? I saw a tiny chick of the R. Plovers on Copeland yesterday.

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    1. Margaret it is a great place. I was hoping for Dragonflies btu it is probably a bt early here. There is the odd butterfly.
      The ringed Plover had dozens of chicks. I didn't see them but the one on the right told me.

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  5. Take a brolly with you to see them skuas they can cause injuries to humans. I am wondering if that Marsh was too salty for some of the birds. Safe journey

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    1. Douglas, yes Skua are aggressive. I'll put my hat on. If I have the dogs they take most of the flak.
      The marsh is a hundred feet above and two hundred yards away from the sea. It should be fresh though I expect spray could reach it in a gale. It is quite extensive over a mile square I would guess.

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  6. Fantastic area, looks like a great place to explore. Those Eider Ducks are an amazing creature , we have them here but way up north close to the Arctic, all along the Arctic coast of Canada and Alaska. Probably along the Atlantic coast of Canada as well. We don't see them here in central Alberta.

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    1. Horst, they are a sea duck, the divers are about half and half. The ones here breed on fresh water and fish in the sea.
      It is a good place to be.

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  7. It's a wonderful part of the World Adrian... really wish I was up there.

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    1. Andrew, yes it suits me here. I've yet to find a bad place north of Ullapool.

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  8. Sitting in our studio apartment in northern Seattle, I just dropped in to see how you are fettling. I hope the weather is kind as you mosey on northwards. Oh by the way, you call your vehicle a camper van? I have seen camper vans here (Recreational Vehicles) that are so enormous they are like palaces on wheels often towing little cars or jeeps behind them - or sometimes massive boats. At freeway "rest areas" they often have facilities for dumping lavatory waste and filling up water tanks. Is it the same in Scourie?

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    1. YP, almost identical. I think Scourie may just have the edge. There is a nubile young lass in wellies and marigolds. Wonderful it saves me getting out of the truck.

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  9. Have a safe and twisty journey Adrian. It all looks spectacularly beautiful.

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    1. Gary when the atmosphere clears enough to enjoy the view it is one of the best.

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  10. Lovely scenery of that part of Scotland, with Eiders, you and the camera are making excellent photos.

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    1. Bob, they seem happy as long as I'm about seventy five yards away. It's good seeing the same birds day after day. I get used to them and they to me I imagine.

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  11. Safe travels. If the lack of view from my house is anything to go by you'll not be seeing much of anything of interest today if it's more than 50 metres from the road.

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    1. Graham, I suspect it is only a sea fret or a whore...I'm sure I should be spelling whore Hoar. Yes it's pretty thick here. I was just switching everything off. We are ready to roll.

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  12. Has hecho muy buena amitad con esos patos;)
    Buena seria Adrian.
    Un abrazo

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    1. Laura, son patos interesantes. Ellos no vienen a menudo fuera del mar.

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  13. That's some route, I'd like to see one day, but who knows if it'll happen. I've only ever been north and west of Inverness by train. A grand finale parting shot of your visit, love that image.

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    1. Jay, it is well worth a tour round.

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