ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Friday, 28 November 2014

I’VE SEEN THE SUN. (28/11/14)

Out this morning for a wander up the hill. No rain, no mist and it was light._MG_0943  I couldn’t quite see the sun but it was the closest I’ve got to it for ages.

_MG_0947   The Old Trig Point.

Tomorrow the dogs are going for a haircut.

_MG_0948     Molly.

_MG_0945       Alfie.

They are not really ready for a trim but I thought I’d get them done before the weather turns cold. It will give it chance to grow a bit.

Have as good weekend.

35 comments:

  1. You need to shoot those pooches with a professional backdrop. They deserve it!

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    1. Maria, they would dry themselves on it. I'll hang a towel behind them as a compromise.

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    2. Did Maria mean shoot them with a camera or a rifle?

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    3. I assumed camera but one can never be sure.

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  2. It's been a poor day today down here, so a bit of sun is a bonus, have a good weekend too.


    peter

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    1. Peter, it is that time of the year but it is warm.

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  3. I love Molly and Alfie!!

    They look like they'd be a lot of fun. My neighbor's Westie is named Michael (The gent is a Michael Jordan fan)

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    1. R. Mac, they are good company. Not too much trouble and what trouble they are is outweighed by the entertainment they provide.

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  4. Aww they're just so cute. And that first photo is lovely.

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    1. Hilary, it didn't last. The dogs are little devils.

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  5. Even though the sun was not visible, the sky is glorious. I love the way Molly and Alfie look! I miss having a dog, but am wary of ice and snow, so I have two cats, which I love.

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    1. Norma, it is good to have animals to look after.

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  6. Your Westies are a handsome pair.

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    1. Joanne, they will be even more handsome later today. They stink of sheep and horse muck with a hint of smelly pond water.

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  7. It looks weird to see green grass! Now trig point has me curious.

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    1. Red, the UK is covered by them. They are theodolite mounting points so that the country could be mapped by triangulation.

      In the United Kingdom, trig points are typically concrete pillars, and were erected by the Ordnance Survey.

      The process of placing trig points on top of prominent hills and mountains began in 1935 to assist in the accurate retriangulation of Great Britain. In low-lying or flat areas some trig points are only a few metres above sea level and one is even at -1 m (in Norfolk, TL6189). When all the trig points were in place, it was possible, in clear weather, to see at least two other trig points from any one trig point but subsequent vegetation growth means that this is not necessarily still the case. Careful measurements of the angles between the lines-of-sight of the other trig points then allowed the construction of a system of triangles which could then be referenced back to a single baseline to construct a highly accurate measurement system that covered the entire country.

      In most of the United Kingdom, trig points are truncated square concrete (occasionally stone) pyramids or obelisks tapering towards the top. On the top a brass plate with three arms and a central depression is fixed and this is used to mount and centre a theodolite used to take angular measurements to neighbouring trig points. A benchmark is usually set on the side, marked with the letters "O S B M" (Ordnance Survey Bench Mark) and the reference number of the trig point. Within and below the visible trig point, there are concealed reference marks whose National Grid References are precisely known. The standard trig point design is credited to Brigadier Martin Hotine (1898–1968), the then head of the Trigonometrical and Levelling Division of the Ordnance Survey.[2] Many of them are now disappearing from the countryside as their function has largely been superseded by aerial photography and digital mapping using lasers and GPS measurements. To quote from a page at the OS site: "Like an iceberg, there is more of trig pillar below the surface than above it."[3] From the same source: "Today the receivers that make up the OS Net network are coordinated to an accuracy of just 3 mm over {the entire length of Great Britain}".

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    2. Interesting. You must be very familiar with surveys and mapping. Here the survey was set up on a grid system. The west wast divided into one square mile sections and then divided into quarters. Most original markers are gone.
      Thanks for the explanation.

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  8. Hope your Westies enjoy their new dos!

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    1. Gillian, I'll have to keep an eye on them. They don't like being clean and will try and escape to roll in something horrible.

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  9. Oh, what a beautiful morning...your photo had me sing that... ;)
    Hope to see a photo of Mollie and Alfie's photos after their hair appt. Their expressions are so sweet!

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    1. Glo, I'll get a photograph if I'm quick enough.

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  10. Surely it's now that the dogs will need their coats? But what do I know. I'm not a dog person (well, not since the running our of dog poo bags episode).

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    1. Frances it isn't the best time of the year but they are difficult to keep clean with long hair. They reek of horse and sheep crap,

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  11. Poor little devils. A true dog lover would have bought them little tartan coats and galoshes to keep them warm and clean as winter approaches. Don't you agree Alf?
    ALF Woof!
    YP Fancy a haircut Molly?
    MOLLY Grrrrrrrr! (howls plaintively)

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    1. YP, they do have coats but don't like wearing them. They seem to be happy enough to go to Kirsten for a hair cut. Anything to have a rest from me for an hour or so.

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  12. I love your dogs with the hair. Adrian, if I may ask, what were you doing before becoming a traveler? Just curious, as you seem to know so much about everything!! :)))

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  13. Always good to see the sun Adrian.
    Foggy start here, but improved.

    Hope the dogs don't get too cold after their trim.

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    1. Keith, it has been grim here for weeks.
      They do have jackets if the weather turns nasty.

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  14. The first image is glorious. Wasn't Scotland (I think the Cairngorms) the first place the OS tried out trig points? Under the belief if it worked in such a varied terrain accurately it'd work well in the rest of the UK.

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    1. Douglas, I don't know where the first ones were built but most experiments are carried out as far from London as possible.

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  15. We have had about the same amount of Sun here recently. Just damp, dull and dismal.

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    1. John, it gets me down after a while.

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  16. Buen paseo Adrian!!.
    Un abrazo.

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