ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Monday, 6 May 2019

MACRO MIDGES AND ESCAPEMENT PROBLEMS.

This morning we visited Loch Leven. I wanted to see the Midges again so cleaned up the MP-E 65mm lens. Popped new Batteries in the ring strobe. I gave lens and flash contacts a gentle wipe with kitchen roll whetted with brake cleaner and off we went midgeing in unpromising weather. It was cold to verging on arctic. I was surprised to find Midges in abundance in areas sheltered from the freezing wind.
This lens takes practise, a steady hand and clean living to achieve focus. The strobe looks after tremors, delirium or other, it can't tell the difference. I called at the CO-OP for a Scotch Pie and the new lassy doing Scotch pies was stunning. I blame her for the pretty average results from both camera and lens. Clean living was the last thing on my mind, carnal thoughts I had. Not an auspicious start to a snapping session.
I took twelve shots and binned over half. 
This is a Dead Nettle flower from below. I started with this and clicked just once. It looked good so I went looking on Willow leaves for flies.


Someone will know what these are but I don't. Google is more interested in today's climate change than identifying flies with a 2-3mm wingspan. I miss not snapping such things. I have cropped these but they will enlarge with a click and can be pumped to pixelisation with Ctrl+.

I have been constructing the escapement wheel for the virtual clock. This one refuses to function.
Don't know why. I guess it need a more aggressive angle on the teeth. Not to worry all this keeps me from fantasising about wee Scotch Pie selling totty.

8 comments:

  1. Looks as though the middle fly could be the non biting midge Chironomus plumosus https://www.naturespot.org.uk/species/chironomus-plumosus

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    1. John, I agree with you on the ID. Still can't find the green one. I do enjoy this lens and the strobe.

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    2. Adrian: Have a look at https://hiveminer.com/Tags/green%2Cmidge/Recent
      Two possibilities - scroll through to the first green midge (on a fern) and click on the photo. Then try the third green midge photo (on a horizontal cedar branch) which gives a possible name - Axarus.

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    3. Thanks John. I think it is Axarus female as it doesn't have feathery antenna.

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  2. The only things that I can ID with any certainty here, Adrian, are some excellent macro images - of what, I have no idea! However, I'm worried that the first one may have been inspired by your pie vendor!

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    1. Richard, I usually try for something white just to check the strobe isn't blowing highlights. The dead nettle must have been my subconscious at work.

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  3. Like usual, your macros are perfect. Regarding 'the fly'. I found that the order is called NEUROPTERA .or net-winged insects, includes the lacewings, mantidflies, antlions, and their relatives. The order consists of some 6,000 species ! Ha!

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    Replies
    1. Daliana, yes they do take a lot of sorting out.

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