ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Tuesday, 2 August 2016

A GOOD START. (02/08/16)

It was a bad start as after hiking my weary bones to the Stinkhorns there was no change at all so I came back and decided to do some hoeing.
I had just propped the hoe against the van whilst awaiting inspiration and summoning the mental and physical resilience to bend my back into some serious de-weeding when I noticed an insect I’ve been trying to get a picture of all summer.
I took some shots at various magnifications and as it was still dozy transferred it to a leaf. They are very difficult to get a focused shot of as they have a high frequency tremble, a bit like moths, the flash can’t freeze it at the settings I tried. I did switch from ETTL or auto strobe mode to 1/8th power to try and still the little devil but with little improvement. Naughty fly. It got bored and flew away before I could drop the flash to it’s fastest or weakest and up the ISO. Silly camera. It could be my fault but I doubt it.
Self doubt is just silly Dithery was a success to some and he never doubts the wisdom of giving knighthoods to plonkers and hairdressers. He never had an iota of doubt nor a smidgen of sense. Nor had he been shot at, run a country or done anything else useful. He employed mates to think for him which we paid for. Even his wife cost £60K a year for haircuts and advice on jumper colours. Why do we pay for these fuckwits. There are maybe 10% of folk who are special needs. Why are they ruling the country?
Anyway on to the snaps. It is a Green Lacewing and could be one of half a dozen but I am going to guess it’s Chrysoperla carnea. The Carnea bit refers to their carnivorous diet of aphids but all lacewings are carnivorous, beautiful little beasts and useful to gardeners.
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That’s all, I’m a happy camper today. Middling happy, had I realised the possibilities of the head on shot with the wings behind I would have taken many more from this aspect. I would prefer them to have one pair of wings but short of drastic surgery it's not something I can do much about. The last shot does emphasise how little depth of field I have at 3X on the camera sensor. It also shows how dirty my van is and what steady hands I have. It is going to rain later so hopefully a bit of wet will inspire action from the fungi and wash some crap off the camper.

24 comments:

  1. Wonderful, sharp detalis! My best regards from Romania!

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    1. Daliana, thank you. it would have been better focus stacked but I'd rather shoot them alive.

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  2. Incredible details of wing intricacy. Genetics, natural selection and evolution are highlighted in the details of insects! Wow... for these photos!

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    1. Marie, I have had this lens for ages. It. a Canon MP-E 65mm. I did wonder why I spent he money on it but have gradually learnt to use it. There are many better shots taken through it but most are of dead insects, If they fly away when I shoot they do. I don't know why it takes me so long to work something as simple as sharp. I guess I'm special needs. I do use a prismatic screen to aid close focus and do support both camera and subject on my left arm. It does become easy with a bit of practise. Like using rear brake to change down fast on a good bike.

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  3. It's so neat how you got the wings.

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    1. Neat and tidy John. Imagine what one wing would look like properly lit. I love macro time.

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  4. Nice set Adrian, interesting to see the wing detail up close...[;o)

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    1. Trevor, I have seen a dozen or more of these and this one was fast off when I found it. It had all on crawling onto the leaf but I was patient. Hoeing, changing a gearbox, I had the time. They are drop dead gorgeous but prior to this one very flighty.

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    2. PS. Trevor none are cropped heavily so are worthy of a look much closer they will print at a foot and a half with no worries. I am thinking of one of the posh HD Sony monitors. Mainly for porn and video but it will come in handy for insects and fungi.

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  5. A great set of macro shots Adrian. Like Trevor I found the wing detail interesting. Something virtually invisible to normal views.

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    1. John. I was amazed by the intricacy. It's not something one can appreciate till you get them up on the monitor.

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  6. Well, Adrian, you obviously weren't using your phone camera because they really are the bee's knees. Seriously they are absolutely superb.

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    1. Graham, my phone is about eight years old. I am amazed how good the iPad phones are for files as large as they have to be for blogging.

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    2. Some of the phone cameras now are amazing and whilst they don't have the versatility of a DSLR like the Canon EOS1 or 5 or even some bridge cameras they can do some remarkable things.

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  7. I agree with Graham. I'm not so taken with its eyes but those wings are amazing.

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    1. Pauline, the wings are what they are all about the eyes are bit disappointing.

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  8. The wing detail is superb. My word, what would you do if you could not rant Adrian!

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    1. Margaret, I'd think of something else to do.

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  9. Replies
    1. CB, thank you I've waited a long time for these.

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  10. Wow! Your shots are just brilliant!

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    1. Siddhartha, thank you very much.

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  11. Thanks for the tip as to why I find lacewings difficult to photograph, Adrian. I've enjoyed all these images, but that last one just blew my socks off!

    Best wishes - - - Richard

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    1. Richard, these are the first useable images I have managed. I'll try and speed the flash up higher next time. The problem is to see the detail I am using 2X/3X magnification and then the depth of field is a mm or so.

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