ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Wednesday, 20 May 2015

A BIG SMILEY FACE. (20/05/15)

This was a bonus on a dry but windy morning. A proper macro and a smiley face.orbweaver. A Green Orb-weaver. Araniella cururbitina. I found it eating it’s breakfast but couldn’t get any shots as everything was blowing this way and that. I picked the leaf it was on and brought it inside. It wasn’t best pleased and was scurrying this way and that. I kept taking pictures and then popped it back where I found it.

_V0G8387 This is the identical frame to the above but as shot with a scale added.

_V0G8382

_V0G8383

_V0G8384    I’m happy as, happy can be with these.

I’ll see what tomorrow brings.

32 comments:

  1. Adrian is pretty amazing if you so he pounces

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    1. Bas, no he is friendly. The jumping spiders are impossible. I lost one and found it sitting on the lens.

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  2. Nice find Adrian...I like that happy face...[;o)

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    1. Trevor, it is a beauty. If this weather settles then lots more should turn up.

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  3. Great macros Adrian, I normally keep away from spiders but maybe they warrant a closer look. The smily face is a brilliant picture.

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    1. Gillian, it's the best I've achieved but I aspire to this:

      ALBERTO PANIZZA

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    1. They are complex creatures Mersad.

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  5. This is really a different creature with large yellow____. I forgot my gr 7 science about the parts of the insect. There's a lot of hair on these guys when you get a good macro shot.

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    1. Red, abdomen or opisthosoma to arachnologists. They have quite a few eyes as well.

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  6. The multiplicity of lifeforms is mindboggling ... as are your pics to me.

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    1. John, I really ought to get out more. I'm going to the shop tomorrow. They just fascinate me do insects.

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  7. Yes, I'm sure you were so happy, they are beautiful............let's see some more.

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    1. Bob, I'll keep trying but the little devils can't half shift and the flower bugs have a nasty nip.

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  8. Great images, Adrian, particularly as these guys are so small. I photographed one last year, and if your images score 10 out of 10, mine possibly rate 0.1 out of 10!!

    Best wishes - - - Richard

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    1. Richard, it's like anything the learning curve is exponential. There are some superb macro photographers but many are using dead subjects. I don't think killing them is worth it for an image.
      I suspect that this is about my limit. The MP-E 65mm is a cracking lens.

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  9. Anyone who had taken those shots would be delighted with them. You sir are a bloody clever old sod!

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    1. Thanks YP, it's only lots of practise. I'll now have to do more work on the surroundings and lighting. It is one of the prettier spiders. The jumping spiders are equally attractive but as their name implies they jump.

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  10. The first one is impressive. You had better luck than I had with a micro moth this morning.

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    1. John, spiders are a bit fast but this one posed for a while when it got to the end of the leaf stalk.

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  11. You should be happy. they are great

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    1. Kevin, I'm slowly getting the knack.

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  12. Hi Adrian, I have never tried macro photography before, after seeing your images I must try sometime. Nice blog and great images!

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    1. Paul, I love seeing detail that is invisible to the naked eye.

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  13. Great images Adrian. I like the first image.

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    1. Douglas, the first image is how all insect portraits should be but the rest help with identification.

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    1. Margaret, as always I was happy to even get it in the frame.

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  15. And so you should be Adrian. They are superb. I think I shall stick to Big Things.

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    1. Graham, your camera on macro setting should manage these and do a better job as DOF will be much greater. The first image will print at 220dpi and about a foot square but then my sensor is massive.

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  16. That was a great bonus really. Beautiful macros as usual!

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