ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Wednesday, 27 May 2015

BRAIN FADE. (27/05/15)

This insecting job is harder than it looks. I have to take two dogs, a big plastic tub, several small tubs to put things in and a camera; I now have a shopping bag to keep all but the dogs in. Yesterday I had a bit of an upset, I only collect about four insects a day as the time spent trying to identify them doesn’t allow for more. Yesterday I was after planthoppers, I  sweep the big plastic tub through the ground cover and it usually comes up with a couple of Delphacidae, that's the buggers posh name for planthopper. Also in the box are numerous midge size flies and the occasional spider. I must have left a spider in with one of the planthoppers as when I got round to getting a picture there was very little left of it. It was a pretty one with orange and black stripes. I’ll have to be more careful.
Today is overcast and cold but the hawthorn is starting to bloom.
Hawthorn leaves and blossom.

This is a member of the Delphacidae family. I thought after much searching that it was Conomelus anceps but have now decided it is a female Eurysa lineata. It’s also brackypterous which is bugger speak for short winged. Long winged are called macropterous.


I think this is a male Javesella possibly Javesella forcipata. The things that look like pincers on it’s bum are, amazingly, it’s wedding tackle. I have a system for photographing these as they can hop a surprisingly long way. I have a big tupperware box and pop a piece of paper in the bottom I can then snap away without them escaping. I lost this one but found it sitting on the front element of the lens. To move these about I use a tiny bit of thick paper and most are good and crawl onto it. I am wary of touching them in case bits fall off. Some, like plant bugs, can bite but they can’t do any damage.
This morning was a bit miserable but I cheered up when I found this little cracker.



I can’t identify it yet but it is really stunning. Just have it's a Tiger Crane Fly; Nephrotoma flavescens. Maybe I haven't as it has spotted wings.  

It was reasonably cooperative, it strolled about and flew a bit then flew away but landed on Molly. I have caught it again and will see if a bit of honey will keep it occupied whilst I try and get enough shots of it’s head for a stack. It looks as if it’s mouth is for sucking up sap or something. It doesn't bite as it is happy sitting on my hand. I think I've cracked it now. It's a Scorpion Fly; Panorpa communis. It's like setting my own quiz is this job. No it doesn't like honey it's flown out of the window.

Have fun I will as Blogger isn't talking to Windows so I can't compose in LiveWriter. I hate using this damn desktop compiler.
All Images will enlarge with a click.

27 comments:

  1. You have got this bug capture and photography down to a bit of a science, can picture you and swooping down with your containers. Great pics Adrian.

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    Replies
    1. Gillian, I never realised how much variety there is.

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  2. You are having too much fun Adrian. It should be illegal.

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    Replies
    1. The way this government is going it probably will be.

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  3. Again, I'm saying you should sell these to whoever makes biology books.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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    Replies
    1. Mersad, I suspect there are very few text books printed now. I get all my identifications from the web and it's free. So are these images if anyone wants one. Prints aren't, I charge for those.

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  4. Brilliant Scorpian Fly, shame you didn't get its arse, that would solved the matter.

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    Replies
    1. This one is a female Bob. Only the males have the scorpion like tail.

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  5. Replies
    1. Bas, I love looking at the tiny creatures.

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  6. "All images will enlarge with a dick". But what if you haven't got a dick - just a lethal pair of pincers like Javesella?

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    Replies
    1. YP, CLICK. They do look fearsome don't they.

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  7. Great macro work again Adrian.


    peter

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  8. Replies
    1. Monica, it is taken on a first surface mirror then rotated 90 degrees. I notice it is upside down.

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  9. Hawthorn is so beautiful. Also your macros as usual.

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    Replies
    1. Kovacs, it is flowering late this year but it should look great in a week.

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  10. Sorry I am of no use with the identity. Great images though.

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    1. Douglas, they are the very devil to identify as many have so many colour and size variations. Some are even at different stages of development and have wings while others don't.

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  11. You do alright on a cold day! It's surprising how many little critters are in the grass. I have laid down and looked closely at the grass and there's a whole community there.

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    1. Red, I wonder how many there are per square metre? Many more than I find that's for sure.

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  12. I like the detail you put into the little bugs. I like the fly's wings....good detail! I know nothing of bugs so I am no use:) Nice close ups!

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    Replies
    1. Chris, I am really enjoying them. Unlike birds and mammals they seem unaffected by the dogs.

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  13. That last one is very elegant. Sorpian fly or scorpion fly? I had to check. See, I do actually read your posts, not just look at the pictures.

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