ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Sunday, 24 May 2015

LOW TECH. BUGERY. (24/05/15)

I’m only finding tiny insects but have a new method of catching them. I sweep a plastic food tub through the grass and have a look what’s in it. Brilliant saves a great deal of crawling about and it works on windy days. It doesn’t work quite so well in damp vegetation as I have to transfer the insects into a dry pot before they drown. When I get them back I transfer them to a stone in a plate of water. This keeps most of them penned in while I take a picture._MG_3604   I have several flatish stones of different hues so that I can show the insect off better. It’s not very large but it doesn’t have to be as neither are the subjects.

_MG_3603      This is a Green Orb-weaver. I usually add a bit of leaf as the spiders seem to settle better with some vegetation. They usually settle bum towards the camera but if I rotate the plate slowly I can get a head on view.

_V0G8428      It’s heading in the right direction.

_V0G8429       Getting closer.

_V0G8436      Here it is on a bit of dandelion leaf.

I have also had trouble remembering what magnification things were taken at. I have had the Canon 1Ds III for over two years and have only just realised that I can just say 2x, 3x, whatever and it produces a WAV file attached to the image. That should save a lot of pondering.

_V0G8460

_V0G8457     I can’t identify this one, I suspect it is a Sheet Web Spider. I spend ages looking through the gallery on the British Arachnological Society's web site but rarely find the spider I have photographed. Again thanks to TREVOR it is a Small hanky-weaver. Microlinyphia pusilla._V0G8451  This is a real stunner. The water didn’t bother it a jot. Dived straight off the stone and swam to the edge of the plate. I just managed this shot before I had to catch it and pop it back outside. I am reasonably confident that it is Tachyporous solutus.

_V0G8444      This is another Rove Beetle but I can’t ID it. It knows what it is and was polite enough to raise a leg to tell me. Fat lot of use that was.

_V0G8450       I think this is one of the Leaf Beetles but I can’t decide which one.It is a wonderful bronze colour though the strobes ruined the colour and I couldn’t pull it back.

That’s all for today. Have a good week.

18 comments:

  1. Clever idea with the cup Adrian. Excellent shots as always.

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    1. Keith, it seems to work well. I see they sell weep nets but I can just imagine the mess on a damp day.

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  2. I think you ara getting very clever with these bugs and your shots of them are fab Adrian

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    1. Margaret, I have more ideas to make them a bit more exciting.

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  3. I can see that you've well and truly got your finger on this bug photography Adrian?
    I bet the locals can believe what they're seeing...." that mad sassenach is at it again, he's doing a jig in the woods with a plastic food container now"

    Another cracking set of images...
    I reckon the second spider is a male Small hanky-weaver (really!)...Microlinyphia pusilla.
    And the leaf beetle...Chrysolina hyperici a St.Johnswort Beetle.

    Keep 'em coming...[;o)

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  4. Trevor, the plastic box works a treat. There are usually a few interesting things in it.
    Microlinyphia pusilla.That looks the spitten image of it but a female, the males are supposed to be all black.
    I was tending towards Chrysolina hyperici but it didn't look at all green.
    The one diasdvantage of the box is I get covered in nettle stings. I'm thinking of trying a plastic milk carton with the top cut out.

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  5. Beautiful images Adrian, I still think that small insects is your prey.

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    1. Bob, it would be easier to find something a bit bigger and use the 100mm macro. I go purple holding my breath with the MP-E 65mm.

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  6. Brilliant Adrian. You have worked out a whole methodology from gathering to photo with excellent results.

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    1. John, the job is a challenge but I am getting used to some of the insects. Rove beetles are early morning job because surprisingly they can fly and fly well. Their wings must be folded all ways to fit but they deploy them in a second. I wish I'd got to grips with this lens earlier. The prismatic focussing screen is a big help and yhey are relatively cheap and easy to fit.

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  7. Loving the spiders at the moment, sadly I've got no idea what they are. Very clever solution to photographing the insects.

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    1. Douglas, I'll try and find some big spiders. If it's fine tonight I'll go out for a look.

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  8. Excelentes fotografias....
    Um abraço

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  9. The first web weaver is a very strange looking beast with such a huge abdomen. I really enjoy your photos and the comments that go along with them

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    1. Red, I'll try and find a crab spider. Their abdomen is so big I don't know how they walk. I know one or two humans like that.

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  10. Me gustan tus experimentos con esos pequeños "mostruos":))
    Un abrazo.

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    1. Laura, todavía logran escapar de vez en cuando.

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