ABOUT ME

I live in a camper van with a couple of West Highland Terriers for company.
My passion is photography but it is a work in progress.
I am always willing to share what knowledge I have and can be contacted through the comments on this post or e-mail ADRIAN
ALL IMAGES WILL ENLARGE WITH A LEFT CLICK

Saturday, 12 September 2020

YOU ARE OLD FATHER ADRIAN.

 I have been a bit rough this week, runny eyes, runny nose less puff and go than usual. I am a bit better today so can't join the rich, famous and sundry lefty tossers to blame Batflu.

Yesterday I helped move seven Highland ponies up the glen, three mares, three foals and the naughty bugger Eros. The foals really enjoyed the journey, skipping and frollicking on the tarmac and generally acting as foals do. The foals follow along, near enough, so are not haltered. One put the fear of god into the DPD van driver as he was in a rush and wanted to pass, I told him he'd have to be patient unless he wanted his headlights kicking out. They thought his van a wonderful new beast to intimidate.

 Guess who got naughty Eros? The owner couldn't catch him and Ally who was also assisting said Adrian can, I've seen him when Eros escapes. Thanks Ally. I wandered down, he saw me and stood perfectly while I popped his head collar on, he then began knocking me this way and that until I got the magic mint box out. The owner wasn't impressed......"I don't bribe my ponies." Horsey women are not to be trifled with so I mumbled sorry and off we set. This pony is very funny, I say walk on and he lifts his head and opens his mouth as wide as he can, imagine a hippo. He then moves his head very slowly towards me threatening to bite........he doesn't if you advise him of the consequences using special words. He goes through this routine at every command stop, go, this way. He has added to his repertoire, If I laugh, he whinnies and if I stamp my foot so does he. He gets a bit close to my foot with his but it takes his mind off more serious antics.

This morning the big excavator right side track was skipping on the drive sprocket. Decided to see if the idler wheel spring had snapped. The tracks are grease tensioned. Released the grease the track went slack, shuffled the machine back and forth tracked to the right but would the track come off. I can often drop a track going in a straight line but it was going to be one of those days. 

Eventually got the idler out but there seems little wrong with it, there was a biggish rock stopping it sliding out but these things eat rock for a living. The boss will check the spring length on Monday but it looks fine. It is usually a broken spring which is a half day job to swap and a mauling one. These are big bits but are on the very limit of manhandlable (not sure that is a proper word but it ought to be). Anything bigger and the workflow is different. You have to split the track and wind it off with the drive sprocket then get a hefty tele-loader to do the lifting. I can't lift this idler and know none who can. The digger bucket moved it this far. 
I still maintain it's going to be a hard winter. The crows are busy burying stuff, the squirrels are hiding their nuts.


The neeps are coming on a treat.

Very little slug damage and the blasted pigeons missed most of the seed. The lambs will be very fat lambs and the pregnant ewes should have plenty to eat.

They are combining the last eight acres or about three hectares for the Europhiles out there. It's a good year the whole crop is going for malting, the yield is good and they are picking it up next week, undried and undressed.
 Amazing what folk will try on. Two weeks ago the buyers were saying that due to Batflu they still had stocks from last year and it would have to be stored on the farm. It was bollocks. Folk working from home will be drinking like fishes as the bosses have no way of telling and many of the latter will be on the piss as well. Farmers are pragmatic folk and most round here said okay, don't call us, we'll give you a ring next year. The sugar and wet man was round the following day and carting was arranged a day later. Prices are middling but better than last year as I suspect some of the big conglomerate farm accountants believed the hype and dumped their crop into animal feed.  

I have decided I don't want to be a Marshall but I do want one.

Perfect, a big single cylinder cartridge start diesel tractor. This one is a bit poofy but gorgeous nonetheless. A Field Marshall.

Some illiterate bastard sent me a couple of memes.

And.

Have fun and don't weaken.

The title is ripped off from Lewis Carroll. "YOU ARE OLD FATHER WILLIAM"


14 comments:

  1. adrian, are you the man who whispers in the ears of horses?
    happy weekend
    beautiful photos, love the squirrel

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    1. Marty I talk to all the animals but they take little notice.

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  2. Well that was all a good laugh in the middle of the night. I like the lion one.

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    1. I get cheered up every time I think of loony lefties and can have a good laugh.

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    2. You keep your curtains drawn the Peeper is close.

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    3. I hope he keeps away from the docks, he might discover an AN store and declare a state of emergency.

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    4. He wouldn't recognise AN. Silos and warehouses don't have windows so will be of little interest.

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    5. He's in big Brexit territory. He better watch he doesn't upset the locals.

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    6. Be better if he did....At least his neighbours are getting a break.

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  3. One never knows what will turn up in your posts. Reading them is like hopping between stones across a stream. Squirrels - twice recently have come across grey squirrels on high, rocky moorland, far away from trees. Seems odd. Are your squirrels behaving strangely?

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    1. Lucy we don't have Greys here and the reds are scampering about and squirrelling away as normal.

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  4. Hope you are feeling better, the fun with the horses probably did you good. Sounds like you have a good mate in Eros. Never thought I'd call a tractor cute but that really is the cutest tractor I've ever seen. Not that I've ever seen another cute one, but you get my drift.

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    1. Pauline he is generally okay but like all stallions it's best not to take your eye off him. He must spend his life working out new ways to make life interesting.
      They are beautiful little tractors but few look like this one. They have got very expensive.

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